Terminal 5 important addition to Riyadh airport, says governor

Riyadh Gov. Prince Faisal bin Bandar and GACA officials inspect the new domestic terminal at King Khaled International Airport (KKIA) in Riyadh.
Updated 03 May 2016

Terminal 5 important addition to Riyadh airport, says governor

RIYADH: Terminal 5 at King Khaled International Airport (KKIA) is an important addition to the Saudi capital, says Riyadh Gov. Prince Faisal bin Bandar.
The prince made this remark during an inspection tour of the new domestic terminal ahead of its inauguration.
He was accompanied by Riyadh Mayor Ibrahim Alsultan.
The governor expressed his pride in the Saudi engineers who contributed to the completion of the project to the best of their abilities.
On his arrival, Prince Faisal was received by General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA) Chairman Sulaiman Al-Hamdan, and his Assistant for Airports Tariq Abdul-Jabbar and Assistant for Corporate Communication and Marketing Bassim Alsalom, as well as KKIA Director General Abdulaziz Abuharba and a number of Saudi engineers involved in the project work.
Prince Faisal was shown all the facilities of the new passenger terminal facilities and listened to a detailed explanation by the GACA chief of the capabilities and modern technologies used at the new terminal, which will greatly contribute to the improvement of services provided at the airport.
“The visit of the governor of Riyadh comes within the framework of the keenness of the prince to inspect all the vital and important projects in the Riyadh region and follow up on the work in progress,” the GACA head is quoted to have said.
He stressed that the new terminal is in its final operation and readiness test mode in preparation for the commencement of its operation.
The new terminal is expected to contribute to meet the projected growth in passenger numbers, more so after the completion of the development of other airport terminals.
The airport is designed to provide advanced and complete services to the traveling public.
Alhamdan added that construction of the new terminal at KKIA comes as a “commitment to the directive given by our wise leadership” to contribute to the convenience of the travelers and as part of the GACA’s strategy for the development of the civil aviation sector across the Kingdom.
He praised the role of the Saudi engineers who worked efficiently and effectively on the project.
The new terminal covers a total of 106,000 sqm and can accommodate seven large-wing aircraft or 16 medium-size aircraft.
The new terminal has an annual capacity of 12 million passengers and contains 60 luggage inspection counters, 20 self-service counters, eight travel gates and five baggage claim conveyor belts measuring 415 meters in length.
Additionally, there are 30 elevators and 21 escalators.
The total area of the first-class and business lounge is 2,400 sqm and a VIP executive office covering 2,784 sqm. The terminal also includes a 4,712 sqm commercial area solely dedicated to shops and a food court.


‘Floating Island’ points to greener tourism

A view of the resort on an artificial island made with recycled plastic waste on the Ebrie Lagoon in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. (AFP)
Updated 34 min 54 sec ago

‘Floating Island’ points to greener tourism

  • The island charges 15,000 CFA francs ($25) per person per day, which includes a meal and the ferry, and 60,000 CFA francs for a night

ABIDJAN: The seaside resort offers visitors a cool drink or tasty meal, a dip in a pool, a karaoke session or an overnight stay, all with a view.
Nothing much new there, you may say — creature comforts like this are pretty much standard in tropical hotels.
The big difference, though, is that this mini resort is also a moveable island that floats on plastic bottles.
Riding on the laguna in Abidjan, Ivory Coast’s economic hub, the unusual complex floats on a platform made from 700,000 discarded bottles and other buoyant debris.
Its inventor, Frenchman Eric Becker, says his creation can help greener, more mobile tourism — something less harmful to seas and coastlines than traditional fixed, concrete resorts.
His “Ile Flottante” — French for “Floating Island” — comprises two thatched bungalows and a restaurant, two small pools, trees and shrubs and a circular walkway, spread out over 1,000 square meters.
Visitors are brought to the moored island by a boat. Water is provided by a pipe from the shore. Electricity is supplied by solar panels, backed by a generator.
The island is bigger than a moored boat and handier than a jetty as it can also be taken to other locations, Becker told AFP.
“It really is an artificial island that floats — you can move it.”
Becker, a former computer entrepreneur, first toyed with the idea of building a catamaran.
But it was when he came to Abidjan and saw the lagoon that the vision of a floating, moveable island came into his mind — and he sold everything he owned to achieve it. The first step was to forage for everything floatable — “plastic bottles, bits of polystyrene, even beach sandals.”
Bemused locals gave him the nickname of “Eric Bidon” — a word that has a subtle dual meaning of jerrycan and phoney.
“We bought disused bottles off people, we foraged for them in the lagoon. After a while, we learned to follow the wind and find the places where floating rubbish accumulates,” he said.
After living on his island for a number of years, Becker turned it into a hotel last year.
He has around 100 customers a week, mostly curious Ivorians or ecologically friendly tourists.

Others want a relaxing break from the bustling city and to use its swimming pools — taking a dip in the lagoon, fouled by industrial pollution and sewage outflows is an act for the foolhardy.
“When you’re competing with major hotels, you need an original idea like a floating island. It’s become a tourist attraction,” said Mathurin Yao Saky, a friend who has been advising Becker on the scheme.
Charles Moliere, a 28-year-old Frenchman who works in Ivory Coast for a large corporation, read about the resort in a guidebook.
“It’s very original, it’s a very untypical place — I’ve seen nothing like it elsewhere,” he said.
“I think it’s a neat idea to give a second life to plastic like this and to make a kind of small technical breakthrough. I like this place a lot.”
The island charges 15,000 CFA francs ($25) per person per day, which includes a meal and the ferry, and 60,000 CFA francs for a night.