Two terrorists killed in Philippines

Philippine National Police Director General Ricardo Marquez talks to the media after reading a joint statement from the military and police on the beheading of Canadian hostage John Ridsdel of Calgary, Alberta by Muslim extremist Abu Sayyaf Group in southern Philippines, in this April 26, 2016 photo, at Camp Crame in suburban Quezon city northeast of Manila, Philippines. (AP)
Updated 30 April 2016
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Two terrorists killed in Philippines

MANILA: Security forces in the southern Philippines have killed two terrorists of a local extremist organization sympathetic to the Daesh group, a police report said Saturday.
Police commandoes raided a hideout of the Ansar Khilafa Philippines (AKP) group in the coastal town of Maasim, killing two fighters, a police report said.
The commandoes recovered a cache of weapons including a sniper rifle, two carbines, rocket-propelled grenades, materials for making improvised explosive devices and a black flag of Daesh, which has captured large swathes of territory in the Middle East.
However the target of the raid, the group’s leader, Jaafar Maguid, escaped, the report added.
The AKP is one of several militant groups in the southern third of the largely-Catholic Philippines that have pledged allegiance to Daesh.
Authorities have said these groups have no direct link to Daesh and are merely using its name to gain prestige locally and in the hope of gaining the international terrorist group’s support and funding.


Japan apologizes to those forcibly sterilized, vows redress

Updated 24 April 2019
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Japan apologizes to those forcibly sterilized, vows redress

  • An estimated 25,000 people were given unconsented sterilization while the 1948 Eugenics Protection Law was in place until 1996
  • The government had until recently maintained the sterilizations were legal at the time

TOKYO: Japan’s government apologized Wednesday to tens of thousands of victims forcibly sterilized under a now-defunct Eugenics Protection Law and promised to pay compensation.
Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said he was offering “sincere remorse and heartfelt apology” to the victims.
His apology comes just after the parliament enactment earlier Wednesday of legislation to provide redress measures, including $28,600 (¥3.2 million) compensation for each victim.
An estimated 25,000 people were given unconsented sterilization while the 1948 Eugenics Protection Law was in place until 1996. The law was designed to “prevent the birth of poor-quality descendants” and allowed doctors to sterilize people with disabilities. It was quietly renamed as the Maternity Protection Law in 1996, when the discriminatory condition was removed.
The redress legislation acknowledges that many people were forced to have operations to remove their reproductive organs or radiation treatment to get sterilized, causing them tremendous pain mentally and physically.
The government had until recently maintained the sterilizations were legal at the time.
The apology and the redress law follow a series of lawsuits by victims who came forward recently after breaking decades of silence. That prompted lawmakers from both ruling and opposition parties to draft a compensation package to make amends for the victims.
The plaintiffs are seeking about ¥30 million each ($268,000) in growing legal actions that are spreading around the country, saying the government’s implementation of the law violated the victims’ right to self-determination, reproductive health and equality. They say the government redress measures are too small for their suffering.
In addition to the forced sterilizations, more than 8,000 others were sterilized with consent, though likely under pressure, while nearly 60,000 women had abortions because of hereditary illnesses, according to Japan Federation of Bar Associations.
Among them were about 10,000 leprosy patients who had been confined in isolated institutions until 1996, when the leprosy prevention law was also abolished. The government has already offered compensation and an apology to them for its forced isolation policy.