TV show to promote Dubai as top Arab ‘make-over’ destination

Updated 29 October 2016
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TV show to promote Dubai as top Arab ‘make-over’ destination

DUBAI: ‘Dubai Beauty’, a makeover show kicked off on Friday evening, hosted by famous beauty consultant Rose Arbaji on Dubai TV channel.
The program aims to bring about cosmetic changes in the general appearance of participants through a therapeutic makeover journey including the face, body, teeth, hairstyle, clothes and accessories to keep up with contemporary fashion trends in accordance with age, social and professional status of the participants. The show provides all the necessary psychological help, diet, and physical training by a group of experts and specialists in this field under the supervision of Arbaji, in order to correct the public perception of beauty.
The new show promotes Dubai as a center of medical tourism in the Gulf and Middle East region, through giving an overview of the most prominent health centers and hospitals in Dubai, in addition to the disclosure of the latest technologies in the world of cosmetics inside the most luxurious hotels and through the main tourist attractions in the UAE.
It is noteworthy that Saudi actress Elham Al-Ali expressed her desire to be the first participant in the show to give other women the courage to change and take advantage of the medical/therapeutic tourism features in Dubai.
The actress goes through a different experience full of surprises, especially as the star enjoys a style characterized by spontaneity and talent. Elham’s transparency shines all throughout as she only needs a few beauty touches.


Drunk on smoke: Notre Dame’s bees survive cathedral blaze

Updated 20 April 2019
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Drunk on smoke: Notre Dame’s bees survive cathedral blaze

PARIS: Hunkered down in their hives and drunk on smoke, Notre Dame’s smallest official residents — some 180,000 bees — somehow managed to survive the inferno that consumed the cathedral’s ancient wooden roof.
Confounding officials who thought they had perished, the bees clung to life, protecting their queen.
“It’s a big day. I am so relieved. I saw satellite photos that showed the three hives didn’t burn,” Notre Dame beekeeper Nicolas Geant told The Associated Press on Friday.
“Instead of killing them, the CO2 (from smoke) makes them drunk, puts them to sleep,” he explained.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Beeopic (@beeopic) on


Geant has overseen the bees since 2013, when three hives were installed on the roof of the stone sacristy that joins the south end of the monument. The move was part of a Paris-wide initiative to boost declining bee numbers. Hives were also introduced above Paris’ gilded Opera.
The cathedral’s hives were lower than Notre Dame’s main roof and the 19th-century spire that burned and collapsed during Monday evening’s fire.
Since bees don’t have lungs, they can’t die from smoke inhalation — but they can die from excessive heat. European bees, unlike some bee species elsewhere, don’t abandon their hives when facing danger.
“When bees sense fire, they gorge themselves on honey and stay to protect their queen, who doesn’t move,” Geant said. “I saw how big the flames were, so I immediately thought it was going to kill the bees. Even though they were 30 meters (nearly 100 feet) lower than the top roof, the wax in the hives melts at 63 degrees Celsius (145.4 Fahrenheit).”

Notre Dame Cathedral’s three beehives — home to more than 180,000 bees  — survived the destructive fire. (Instagram/Beeopic)

If the wax that protects their hive melts, the bees simply die inside, Geant explained.
Smoke, on the other hand, is innocuous. Beekeepers regularly smoke out the hives to sedate the colony whenever they need access inside. The hives produce around 75 kilograms (165 pounds) of honey annually, which is sold to Notre Dame employees.
Notre Dame officials saw the bees on top of the sacristy Friday, buzzing in and out of their hives.
“I wouldn’t call it a miracle, but I’m very, very happy,” Geant added.