Saudi cinema strongly present at Carthage

Tunisian film director Ridha Behi and Tunisian-Egyptian actress Hind Sabri, heroine of the new Tunisian film “Flowers of Aleppo,” arrive for the opening ceremony of the 50th “Journées Cinematographique de Carthage” film festival on Friday in Tunis. (AFP)
Updated 29 October 2016
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Saudi cinema strongly present at Carthage

TUNIS: The 27th edition of Carthage Film Festival opened on Friday with the screening of ‘Fleur d’Alep’ (The Flower of Aleppo) by Tunisian director Ridha Behi in Tunis.
There are 68 films in competition in various sections until Nov. 5, with screenings and other events in various locations across the country. The program has been put together by film director Mohamed Challouf, who has been tasked with restoring the festival to its original splendour in honor of its 50th anniversary this year.
A total of 18 films will participate in the feature film competition (Gold Tanit Award), which this year is headed by Mauritanian filmmaker and producer Abderrahmane Sissako. The jury comprises six other members among them Egyptian director Khaled Youssef.
As for the short film competition, it comprises 19 films, including Saudi film ‘Retribution’ by Abdullah Abuljadail.
In addition, a total of 13 films are competing in the first feature film category, among them the prize-winning Saudi romcom ‘Barakah Meets Barakah’ by Mahmoud Sabbagh.




Novelties include numerous parallel sections, homages to directors of the past, an overview of prizewinning films from previous editions and a special focus on Russian and Asian cinema. A special prize will be awarded to Tunisian director Ferid Boughdir for his passion for cinema and commitment to the Carthage Film Festival.


400-year-old shipwreck ‘discovery of decade’ for Portugal

Updated 25 September 2018
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400-year-old shipwreck ‘discovery of decade’ for Portugal

  • Freire and his team believe the ship was wrecked between 1575 and 1625, when Portugal’s spice trade with India was at its peak

CASCAIS, Portugal: Archaeologists searching Portugal’s coast have found a 400-year-old shipwreck believed to have sunk near Lisbon after returning from India laden with spices, specialists said on Monday.
“From a heritage perspective, this is the discovery of the decade,” project director Jorge Freire said. “In Portugal, this is the most important find of all time.”
In and around the shipwreck, 40 feet (12 meters) below the surface, divers found spices, nine bronze cannons engraved with the Portuguese coat of arms, Chinese ceramics and cowry shells, a type of currency used to trade slaves during the colonial era.
Found on Sept. 3 off the coast of Cascais, a resort town on the outskirts of Lisbon, the shipwreck and its objects were “very well-preserved,” said Freire.
Freire and his team believe the ship was wrecked between 1575 and 1625, when Portugal’s spice trade with India was at its peak.
In 1994, Portuguese ship Our Lady of the Martyrs was discovered near Fort of Sao Juliao da Barra, a military defense complex near Cascais.
“For a long time, specialists have considered the mouth of the Tagus river a hotspot for shipwrecks,” said Minister of Culture Luis Mendes. “This discovery came to prove it.”
The wreck was found as part of a 10-year-old archaeological project backed by the municipal council of Cascais, the navy, the Portuguese government and Nova University of Lisbon.