‘Roads of Arabia’ show opens in Beijing today

A rare archaeological piece to be on display at the show in Beijing.
Updated 20 December 2016
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‘Roads of Arabia’ show opens in Beijing today

RIYADH: “Roads of Arabia” exhibition opens Tuesday in the Chinese capital, Beijing.
The exhibition, to be held at the Chinese National Museum in Beijing, is showing for the first time in an Asian country; it was previously held in four European countries, five US cities and, locally, at the King Abdulaziz Center for World Culture in Dhahran.
The Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTNH) and the National Museum in Beijing finished preparations for the launch of the fair where 466 rare archeological pieces were installed in the exhibition’s showroom in coordination with the Saudi Embassy in China.
The pieces present Saudi Arabia’s cultural heritage and civilization starting with the Stone Age, the pre-Islamic era, and early, medieval and late civilizations of Arab monarchies. It also passes through the Islamic and Medieval Islamic period until the establishment of the Saudi state, in 1744, till the era of King Abdulaziz, the founder of the modern Saudi state.
Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman inaugurated the exhibition when it was held in Dhahran.
King Salman encouraged the exhibition to tour East Asian countries, starting with the Chinese capital, after the remarkable success it enjoyed before, in the French capital, at the Louvre museum, in Barcelona, Russia, Germany and the four US cities: Washington, St. Petersburg, Houston, Kansas and San Francisco.
The exhibition introduces the history and civilization of the Arabian Peninsula to the rest of the world, as well as enhances the cultural connection between the different nations of the world and highlights the fact that the Kingdom is a cradle of great human civilization that culminated in the great civilization of Islam.
The exhibition in China is sponsored by Saudi Aramco, which also sponsored previous fairs.


King Salman, Crown Prince Mohammed ‘lend new dimension to unification’

Millions of citizens plan to celebrate the Saudi national day on Sunday. (SPA)
Updated 23 September 2018
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King Salman, Crown Prince Mohammed ‘lend new dimension to unification’

  • More than 900,000 fireworks will light up the sky from 58 locations across the Kingdom

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia’s National Day, celebrated every year on Sept. 23, has come a long way in broadening the concept of unification over the years.
Though the National Day meant unifying disparate sheikhdoms under the nation’s founder, the late King Abdul Aziz, its implications across the political, socioeconomic and cultural spectrum have not been lost on successive rulers.
It was King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman who fine-tuned the definition of unification as an operating philosophy. This is why millions of citizens plan to celebrate the Saudi National Day on the streets on Sunday.
The capital city, along with other Saudi cities, will witness fireworks and the unfurling of the largest national flag. More than 900,000 fireworks will light up the sky from 58 locations across the Kingdom.
Car owners, limousine drivers and young Saudi motorcyclists said that they planned to go for drives, particularly on the fashionable streets of the capital city, to celebrate. Grocery shops, stationery shops and vendors were selling bunting, flags, banners and pictures of national heroes.
“We went around the city to see the lighting and fireworks,” said Saleh Al-Omri, a local pharmacist. “Green and white balloons fill either sides of Riyadh streets,” he said.
In his National Day congratulatory message, Sheikh Abdul Aziz bin Abdullah Al-Sheikh, Grand Mufti of Saudi Arabia, said: “The wise policy of the leaders of this country contributed to peace, security and stability.”
Fakhr Al-Shawaf, chief executive of Al-Bawani Contracting Co., said: “We are celebrating the 88th anniversary of our unification, a day when the late King Abdul Aziz established the Saudi nation.”
Ali Al-Othaim, a member of Riyadh Chamber’s board of directors, said: “The Kingdom is on the path of comprehensive economic and social development under Vision 2030.”
Shafik Namdar, a taxi driver, said that he had bought an SR10 flag for his car and planned to work and also drive with his friends to look at the city and its landmark buildings.
Several young boys, including Arslan, 12, and Mishal, 14, said that they had bought bunting, badges and flags to decorate their houses. They planned to celebrate with a special meal at home with relatives, before going into the city streets for dance and music. Some of them had plans to organize celebrations in public parks.