Jeddah summit to explore new trends in facilities management industries

There are already many green FM projects running in places like KAUST (pictured) and Saudi Aramco.
Updated 13 January 2017
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Jeddah summit to explore new trends in facilities management industries

JEDDAH: Leaders of the facilities management industry (FM) will meet at an international level summit in Jeddah on Sunday to discuss FM solutions and new trends in the cleaning, and waste management industries.
The Facilities Management Leaders’ Summit will take place at the Jeddah Center for Forum and Events in parallel with the FM Expo Saudi and Saudi Clean Expo from Jan. 15 to 17.
The FM service industry, which is concerned with the operation and maintenance of buildings and properties, is witnessing a fast growth in Saudi Arabia.
The event will address this evolvement by highlighting major infrastructure projects, higher rates of outsourcing as well as regulatory plans.
“This summit is an essential step in the progress and development of the FM industry in Saudi Arabia,” Mohammad Tassi, who will be giving a talk on Green FM, told Arab News.
“Conferences and educational summits are cornerstones as they provide vital knowledge, exposure to various specialties in the field, which is still evolving, and give the chance for people working in the industry to exchange ideas and expertise.”
The summit will discuss the business opportunities for the FM sector in Saudi Arabia. It aims to outline the potential impact on the facilities management and asset management sectors in line with the 2030 Vision, and will also focus on raising the awareness on green environment friendly FM.
“There is a huge potential in Saudi Arabia,” added Tassi, who is the director of facilities, King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center (KAPSARC) based in Riyadh.
“The FM industry is still evolving and the green FM is in its early stages. I can already see many green FM projects running in places like King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and Saudi Aramco. But at the same time you find other places where you feel that green FM implementation is missing. The industry is still growing.”
He said that training and education in this area is crucial as well as the change of human behavior.
“We need to think about FM in a comprehensive manner and as a science rather than just a maintenance practice. Once we change the perception about FM, we can start moving forward in the knowledge, expertise and the implementation,” he told Arab News.
The opening remarks will be chaired by Lionel Prodgers, managing director of Agents4RM.
Other speakers include Richard Naylor, CEO of DTZ, Alistair Stranack, partner at Credo Business Consulting, Saleh Al-Rajhi, general manager of Advance Facilities Management, and Barry Clarke, general manager of Qatar and Saudi Arabia Mace Marco.


US poised to end waivers for 5 countries importing Iranian oil

Updated 35 min 53 sec ago
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US poised to end waivers for 5 countries importing Iranian oil

  • Japan, South Korea, Turkey, China and India were exempted from sanctions until May 2
  • Since November, Italy, Greece and Taiwan have stopped importing oil from Iran

WASHINGTON: The Trump administration is poised to tell five nations, including allies Japan, South Korea and Turkey, that they will no longer be exempt from US sanctions if they continue to import oil from Iran, officials said Sunday.
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo plans to announce on Monday that the administration will not renew sanctions waivers for the five countries when they expire on May 2, three US officials said. The others are China and India.
It was not immediately clear if any of the five would be given additional time to wind down their purchases or if they would be subject to US sanctions on May 3 if they do not immediately halt imports of Iranian oil.
The officials were not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity ahead of Pompeo’s announcement.
The decision not to extend the waivers, which was first reported by The Washington Post, was finalized on Friday by President Donald Trump, according to the officials. They said it is intended to further ramp up pressure on Iran by strangling the revenue it gets from oil exports.
The administration granted eight oil sanctions waivers when it re-imposed sanctions on Iran after Trump pulled the US out of the landmark 2015 nuclear deal. They were granted in part to give those countries more time to find alternate energy sources but also to prevent a shock to global oil markets from the sudden removal of Iranian crude.
US officials now say they do not expect any significant reduction in the supply of oil given production increases by other countries, including the US itself and Saudi Arabia.
Since November, three of the eight — Italy, Greece and Taiwan — have stopped importing oil from Iran. The other five, however, have not, and have lobbied for their waivers to be extended.
NATO ally Turkey has made perhaps the most public case for an extension, with senior officials telling their US counterparts that Iranian oil is critical to meeting their country’s energy needs. They have also made the case that as a neighbor of Iran, Turkey cannot be expected to completely close its economy to Iranian goods.