Sri Lanka pledges cooperation in implementing Saudi Vision 2030

Jeddah Gov. Prince Mishaal bin Majid meets with Sri Lankan Consul General Faizer Mackeen in Jeddah.
Updated 13 January 2017
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Sri Lanka pledges cooperation in implementing Saudi Vision 2030

RIYADH: Sri Lanka pledged its cooperation for the successful implementation of Saudi Vision 2030 during a meeting between Jeddah Gov. Prince Mishal bin Majid and the island’s Consul General in Jeddah Faizer Mackeen recently.
Commending on the progressive measures spelled out in Vision 2030 during his meeting with the prince, the diplomat said that his country would lend full cooperation to Saudi Arabia, which hosts millions of expatriates.
He said Vision 2030 is a comprehensive program that aims to turn the Kingdom into a knowledge-based country, which would eventually diversify its economic programs without solely depending on oil.
Following the end of the ethnic problems on the island, the envoy said a large number of tourists from Saudi Arabia have been traveling to Sri Lanka as tourists.
He added that Saudi families who had visited Sri Lanka had always opted to repeat the visit because of the island’s scenic beauty and the hospitality of its people. “Muslim visitors will feel at home in the city of Colombo since they could see mosques in the vicinity of every shopping center,” he said. In fact, he said, women in hijab are a common sight in the city. “A good number of Saudis current visiting Sri Lanka for leisure and honeymoon.”
The island has more than 18,000 quality rooms and it is studded with quality hotels such as Shangrila, Movenpick, Cinnamon Grand, Cinnamon Lake, Taj Exotica, Light House, and Heritance Hotels, Kingsbury and Galadari for the comfort of luxury tourists.
Sri Lanka is home to eight UNESCO World Heritage Sites, several Buddhist and Hindu temples, and other ancient monuments that serve as attractions for travelers. Adam’s Peak, a mountain in the Central Province with the shape of a footprint on its peak, is considered sacred to a number of religions. The eight UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Sri Lanka include the central highlands area comprising Hortons Plains National Park and Knuckles Conservation Forest, the Sinharaja Forest Reserve, the Dutch Fort in Galle, the Golden Temple of Dambulla, the Temple of Tooth in Kandy and the ancient cities of Polonnaruwa, Anuradhapura, and Sigiriya.
“Ever since we established diplomatic relations with the Kingdom in July 1974, the two countries have been maintaining excellent relations in social, cultural, political and economic fields,” Mackeen said. He added that the relationship with Saudi Arabia is significant not only because it is home to nearly 250,000 Sri Lankans but also is holy land for Muslims who form 7 percent of the country’s 24 million population. A large number of Sri Lankan Muslims regularly come for the annual Haj, and Umrah throughout the year.
“We are thankful to the leadership of King Salman for the special care given to the Muslims from all parts of the world including Sri Lanka.”


‘Saudi Arabia’s stability, security a red line for Muslim world’

The Supreme Council of the Muslim World League (MWL) holds its 43rd session in Makkah. (SPA)
Updated 21 October 2018
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‘Saudi Arabia’s stability, security a red line for Muslim world’

  • The council praised the Kingdom’s pioneering role in the Muslim world, its religious importance, its history of supporting international security and peace efforts

JEDDAH: The Supreme Council of the Muslim World League (MWL) held its 43rd session in Makkah, with senior scholars and ministers from Muslim countries in attendance.
The council expressed solidarity with the Saudi leadership and people, and condemned attempts to target the Kingdom, saying its stability and security are a red line for the Muslim world.
The council praised the Kingdom’s pioneering role in the Muslim world, its religious importance, its history of supporting international security and peace efforts, and its fight against extremism and terrorism.
The great place that the Kingdom occupies in the hearts of Muslims is founded on a sincere and firm belief in its care for Muslim sanctity, the council said, adding that targeting Saudi stability also affects international stability.
The council discussed several matters, including the Palestinian cause, developments in Syria and Yemen, the tragedy of Myanmar’s Rohingya people, the fight against extremist groups such as Al-Qaeda and Daesh, and the importance of promoting dialogue among followers of different religions and cultures.
It also discussed the well-being of Muslim minorities in non-Muslim countries, expressing regret and concern about Islamophobia, and calling for peaceful coexistence.
The council urged Muslims in these countries to fulfil their duty to educate their children, and protect them from deviant ideologies and groups that use religion as a pretext to justify terrorism and extremism.
It also urged Muslims in these countries to use legitimate channels to enjoy their just religious and cultural rights, to contribute to societal development, and to support stability and integration.
The council highlighted the MWL’s efforts and international presence in influential platforms, especially in the West.
Islamophobia is creating serious rifts in multicultural societies and damaging the social contract based on equal citizenship, the council said.
It expressed its full support for the MWL’s programs and activities that highlight the truth about Islam and its values, promote intellectual and religious awareness among Muslim minorities, and spread the values of toleration, moderation and peace.
The council reviewed the MWL’s efforts against radicalization and terrorism, including international collaborative programs, conferences, forums, statements and visits to Muslim and non-Muslim countries.
It noted the MWL’s efforts to promote dialogue among followers of different religions and cultures, including its secretary-general’s meeting with Vatican leaders, the signing of a historic cooperation agreement with the Pontifical Council for Interfaith Dialogue, and organizing an international peace conference at Oxford University.
The council agreed to establish an international center for cultural exchanges, as part of its support for the Conference on Cultural Rapprochement between the US and the Muslim World.
The council stressed the importance of building good East-West relations and launching initiatives to foster cooperation, cultural exchanges and positive values.
“Only 10 percent of our common principles are sufficient to bring peace and harmony to our world,” said MWL Secretary-General Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdul Karim Al-Issa.