Lebanese designer grabs US limelight

1 / 2
2 / 2
Melania Trump arrives for a reception and dinner at Union Station in Washington on Thursday. (AFP)
Updated 20 January 2017
0

Lebanese designer grabs US limelight

WASHINGTON: For one of her first inaugural weekend appearances on Thursday — a candlelight dinner at Union Station — US First Lady Melania Trump chose a shimmery gold dress from Lebanese-born, New York-based Reem Acra.
The designer, a Hollywood favorite, has also lived in Paris and Hong Kong. She is known for her eponymous bridal gowns and refined, often intricately crafted evening wear that draws from a diverse range of influences.
Acra’s involvement, however, fueled some social media remarks as Twitterati recalled President Donald Trump’s past remarks on immigration.
@BeirutCityGuide tweeted: “Why would @reem_acra dress Melania Trump? After everything her husband has said about Arabs and immigrants...”
A spokeswoman for Melania Trump said: “Mrs. Trump appreciates the well wishes she has received from around the world and looks forward to participating in the events of the next few days along with the American people.”
The Telegraph noted Trump’s choice for the pre-inauguration gala appeared to be a nod to both the US fashion industry and its global diversity.
Acra is also a red carpet go-to and was the designer behind the Jennifer Lopez’s similarly figure-hugging gown at the People’s Choice awards on Wednesday evening.
Trump chose a high-neck, long-sleeved gold gown with embroidery that one New York designer and longtime family friend of the Trumps, who was in the crowd, described Thursday night as “magnificent.”
Acra still maintains a home in Beirut.
In May 2013, she said, “(My) heart is here in the region,” when referring to Beirut.
Acra describes her work as “breathtaking collections in ready-to-wear and bridal” that “combines tradition with a modern aesthetic and leads the way by continuously redefining the boundaries of fashion,” according to her website — reemacra.com.
Choosing an Acra gown was a strategic move for the first lady, VanityFair reported.


Woman wears wedding gown after fiance dies in Lion Air crash

In this photo taken on Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018, and released by Intan Syari, Indonesian Intan Syari poses in her wedding dress with a bouquet of flowers on the day of her planned wedding in Pangkal Pinang, Indonesia. (AP)
Updated 15 sec ago
0

Woman wears wedding gown after fiance dies in Lion Air crash

  • Lion Air is one of Indonesia’s youngest airlines but has grown rapidly, flying to dozens of domestic and international destinations

JAKARTA, Indonesia: An Indonesian woman whose fiance died on a Lion Air flight that plunged into the sea was photographed in her wedding dress and professed her love for him on the day they were to have been married.
Intan Syari’s fiance, Dr. Rio Nanda Pratama, was among 189 people who were killed when the Boeing 737 crashed Oct. 29 shortly after taking off from Jakarta.
Syari and Pratama, both 26, had planned to get married Sunday. Pratama, who had attended a seminar in Jakarta, was on his way home to Pangkal Pinang for the wedding.
Syari said Pratama had joked before leaving that if he was late in returning, Syari should take photos in her wedding gown and send them to him.
“We were just joking at that time,” Syari told The Associated Press on Wednesday. “He asked me to still wear my wedding gown that he chose for me on our wedding day, put on beautiful makeup and hold a white rose bouquet, take good photos and send them to him.”
She said Pratama was her “first love” and they started dating 13 years ago.
On Sunday, she went ahead and took photos in the white wedding gown with a white satin head covering and a white rose bouquet in her hand, surrounded by relatives and friends.
“Although I actually feel grief that I cannot describe, I have to smile for you,” Syari wrote on Instagram. “I should not be sad, I have to stay strong as you always say to me, I love you, Rio Nanda Pratama.”
Investigators say sensors that help prevent planes from stalling were replaced on the Lion Air plane the day before its fatal flight and may have compounded other problems with the aircraft.
Body parts are still being recovered and searchers are continuing to hunt for the cockpit voice recorder.
Lion Air is one of Indonesia’s youngest airlines but has grown rapidly, flying to dozens of domestic and international destinations.