Zuckerberg drops Hawaiin land lawsuits after outcry

Mark Zuckerberg
Updated 28 January 2017
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Zuckerberg drops Hawaiin land lawsuits after outcry

HONOLULU: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is dropping lawsuits that sought to buy out Native Hawaiians who own small pieces of land within his sprawling Kauai estate, after days of public outcry.
State representatives had criticized the legal action, while neighbors of the property reportedly planned to march this week in protest.
Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, said in a letter to the community published Friday in The Garden Island newspaper that they are ending the cases “to find a better path forward.” They say they “will work together with the community on a new approach.”
A Zuckerberg spokesman confirmed the couple sent the letter.
The 14 parcels mostly belong to Native Hawaiian families awarded the land during the mid-19th century, when private property was established in Hawaii. Many original owners died without wills. Ownership today is split among hundreds of descendants, many of whom are unaware of their shares.
The couple filed court cases last month to identify the parcel owners and ask the court to auction the land.


Police visit ‘Saturday Night Live’ star after Instagram post

Updated 16 December 2018
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Police visit ‘Saturday Night Live’ star after Instagram post

  • Earlier this month, the comedian wrote on Instagram that he has spoken about borderline personality disorder from which he says he suffers
  • A police spokesman declined to say where officers met with Ariana Grande’s ex-fiance on Saturday

NEW YORK: New York City police were concerned about Pete Davidson after he wrote “I don’t want to be on this earth anymore” on Instagram. And they visited the “Saturday Night Live” star to make sure he was OK.
A police spokesman declined to say where officers met with Ariana Grande’s ex-fiance on Saturday. But his Instagram posting was deleted and NBC did not cancel its live show.
What alarmed Davidson’s fans and authorities was the tone of the entertainer’s post: “I’m doing my best to stay here for you but I actually don’t know how much longer I can last. All I’ve ever tried to do was help people. Just remember I told you so.” He added a heart emoji.
Social media erupted with words of love for the 25-year-old comedian and native New Yorker who first appeared on “Saturday Night Live” in 2014. And his name is trending on Twitter.
One admirer tweeted “hang in there. There is a lot of help out here. Surrender to some love ... I’m praying for you Pete. I’ve been there. It gets better.”
Earlier this month, Davidson wrote on Instagram that he has spoken about borderline personality disorder from which he says he suffers, “and being suicidal publicly only in the hopes that it will help bring awareness and help kids like myself who don’t want to be on this earth.
“No matter how hard the Internet or anyone tries to make me kill myself. I won’t. I’m upset I even have to say this.”
Davidson and Grande were engaged in June, but broke up earlier this fall.
In November, Davidson apologized for mocking the appearance of a veteran who lost an eye in Afghanistan.
He said Lt. Com. Dan Crenshaw, now a congressman-elect from Texas, “deserves all the respect in the world.”
On SNL’s “Weekend Update” segment , Davidson was joined by Crenshaw, a Navy SEAL.
Davidson had mocked Crenshaw a week earlier, saying viewers might be surprised he’s “not a hit man in a porno movie.”
Crenshaw, a Republican who won a House seat in the 2018 midterm elections, took some joking shots at Davidson. And when his cellphone rang, the tone was “Breathin” by Grande.
Crenshaw got serious at the end, encouraging civilians and veterans to connect and paying tribute to heroes like Davidson’s father, a firefighter who died in the 9/11 terror attacks.