Zuckerberg drops Hawaiin land lawsuits after outcry

Mark Zuckerberg
Updated 28 January 2017
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Zuckerberg drops Hawaiin land lawsuits after outcry

HONOLULU: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is dropping lawsuits that sought to buy out Native Hawaiians who own small pieces of land within his sprawling Kauai estate, after days of public outcry.
State representatives had criticized the legal action, while neighbors of the property reportedly planned to march this week in protest.
Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, said in a letter to the community published Friday in The Garden Island newspaper that they are ending the cases “to find a better path forward.” They say they “will work together with the community on a new approach.”
A Zuckerberg spokesman confirmed the couple sent the letter.
The 14 parcels mostly belong to Native Hawaiian families awarded the land during the mid-19th century, when private property was established in Hawaii. Many original owners died without wills. Ownership today is split among hundreds of descendants, many of whom are unaware of their shares.
The couple filed court cases last month to identify the parcel owners and ask the court to auction the land.


Bum move: Kardashian ‘kimono’ shapewear sparks Japan debate

Updated 26 June 2019
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Bum move: Kardashian ‘kimono’ shapewear sparks Japan debate

  • The pop culture icon unveiled the new ‘Kimono’ line on Twitter
  • But the announcement garnered mixed reaction both at home and in Japan

TOKYO: American television star Kim Kardashian has sparked debate in Japan by naming her new line of shapewear “Kimono,” prompting some to accuse her of disrespecting the traditional outfit.
The pop culture icon unveiled the new “Kimono” line on Twitter, revealing she had been working for a year on the underwear to offer “solutions for women that actually work.”
But the announcement garnered mixed reaction both at home and in Japan, with some offering their criticism on Twitter using the hashtag #KimOhNo.
“She’s been to Japan many times. I’m shocked. She has no respect,” tweeted one user in Japanese.
“I like Kim Kardashian, but please pick a name other than kimono if it’s underwear,” wrote another.
“The Japanese government should file a protest against Kardashian,” wrote a third.
Kimono literally means “something to wear,” while Kardashian’s use of it appeared to be a play on her first name. The new line’s website offered no explanation, and Kardashian has yet to respond to her online detractors.
And not everyone was opposed to the name, with some users arguing it could offer a chance to promote a traditional outfit that is declining in popularity even in Japan.
Once a standard of the Japanese wardrobe, the kimono is now often reserved for special occasions, such as weddings and coming-of-age ceremonies, and is mostly worn by women.
And while the elaborate outfits might appear to have little in common with the snug garb being offered by Kardashian, kimonos are not only often hugely expensive but known for being hard to wear.
Women frequently hire experts to dress them in kimono because the outfit requires seemingly endless nipping, tucking and strapping.