Court approves arrest of Samsung heir

Employees walk past a logo of Samsung Group at its headquarters in Seoul, South Korea, on Friday. (AP)
Updated 17 February 2017
0

Court approves arrest of Samsung heir

SEOUL: A South Korean court approved on Friday the arrest of a billionaire heir to Samsung accused of bribery and other charges in connection to a massive corruption scandal, a stunning decline for the princeling of South Korea’s richest family.
The Seoul Central District Court’s decision to issue a warrant to arrest Lee Jae-yong, 48, a vice chairman at Samsung Electronics and the only son of Samsung chair Lee Kun-hee.
The arrest of Samsung’s de facto leader will likely shock the business community and cheer the critics of chaebol, the South Korean family-controlled business conglomerates that dominate the economy.
It was seen as a test of the country’s judicial system that in the past had been lenient toward the powerful business elite families at chaebol for their white-collar crimes, citing their contributions to the national economy.
The court said additional evidence showed there were enough reasons to take Lee into custody. Prosecutors can detain him for up to 20 days before formally indicting him.
The court dismissed prosecutors’ request to arrest Park Sang-jin, a president at Samsung Electronics overseeing external relations, saying that it was difficult to justify Park’s arrest given his position and role within the company.
Lee was waiting for the decision at a detention center near Seoul overnight after a closed-door court hearing that lasted more than seven hours on Thursday. He was taken into custody while Park was released. Local media reported that Lee was sent to solitary confinement. The detention center declined to comment, saying it cannot give out private details.
Samsung said it will continue to defend itself in court.
“We will do our best to ensure that the truth is revealed in future court proceedings,” it said in a statement.
Lee avoided arrest last month when the court said prosecutors did not have enough evidence. The special prosecution team, probing the influence-peddling scandal that led to the impeachment of the country’s president, said they had gathered more evidence to strengthen their case and made a second request.
Prosecutors accused Lee of giving bribes worth $36 million to President Park Geun-hye and her close friend Choi Soon-sil to win government favors for a smooth company leadership transition. They are also investigating Lee on allegations of embezzlement of Samsung funds, hiding assets overseas and lying under oath during a parliamentary hearing.
The court decision could also help the prosecution team bring bribery charges against President Park Geun-hye whose powers were suspended in December by Parliament.
The special prosecution office is also reportedly looking into whether the value of Samsung Biologics, which went public last year, was overpriced to benefit the Samsung founding family and also whether the fair trade commission gave any favors to Samsung in relation to its complex cross shareholding structure, which allows the Lee family to control the sprawling businesses with only a minority stake.


Oil prices drop on potential increase in OPEC output

Updated 13 min 9 sec ago
0

Oil prices drop on potential increase in OPEC output

SEOUL: Oil prices fell on Thursday on expectations that OPEC members will step up production in the face of worries over supply from both Venezuela and Iran.
A surprise build up in crude oil inventories in the United States also weighed on prices, driving the spread between Brent crude and US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) close to its widest in three years.
International benchmark Brent futures were down 27 cents, or 0.34 percent, at $79.53 per barrel at 0300 GMT.
US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were down 17 cents, or 0.24 percent, at $71.67 a barrel.
The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) may decide to increase oil output to make up reduced supply from Iran and Venezuela in response to concerns from Washington over a rally in oil prices, OPEC and oil industry sources told Reuters.
Supply concerns in Iran and Venezuela following new US sanctions had pushed both Brent and WTI to multi-year highs, with Brent breaking through an $80 threshold last week for the first time since November 2014.
“The chat is still that OPEC will do something at its June meeting in reaction to the looming prospect of a fall in crude production and exports from both Iran and Venezuela as the year progresses,” said Greg McKenna, chief market strategist at CFD and FX provider AxiTrader.
OPEC and some non-OPEC major oil producers are scheduled to meet in Vienna on June 22. The group previously agreed to curb their output by about 1.8 million barrels per day to boost oil prices and clear a supply glut.
“Any signs that the group may be heading toward an early exit from the production cut agreement would weigh on prices,” ANZ bank said in a note.
Meanwhile, commercial US crude inventories rose by 5.8 million barrels in the week to May 18, beating analyst expectations for a decrease of 1.6 million barrels, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) said on Wednesday.
Elsewhere, Libya, which is an OPEC member, cut its oil production by about 120,000 barrels per day as unusually hot weather prompted power problems, an official from the National Oil Corp. said on Wednesday.
Stephen Innes, head of trading for Asia-Pacific at futures brokerage OANDA in Singapore, said that prices were getting some support from talk that Sinopec, Asia’s largest refiner, would increase US crude oil imports to a record high.
“Recent flow is suggesting short-term traders are looking to sell the $80 per barrel chart-toppers anticipating a possible compliance shift within the OPEC-Non Opec supply agreement,” he added in a note on Thursday.