Malaysia police: Houthi terror plot ahead of King Salman’s visit thwarted

Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman. (SPA)
Updated 08 March 2017
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Malaysia police: Houthi terror plot ahead of King Salman’s visit thwarted

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia on Tuesday said suspected militants from Yemen arrested late last month ahead of a visit by Saudi King Salman were planning an attack on “Arab royalties.”
A senior police source said the four Yemenis belonged to a Houthi insurgency group that has been fighting Yemeni forces backed by a Saudi-led military coalition for two years.
King Salman arrived in Kuala Lumpur on Feb. 26 with a 600-strong delegation for a four-day visit, at the start of a month-long Asia tour. He is currently in Indonesia.
Between Feb. 21 and Feb. 26, Malaysia arrested one Malaysian and six foreigners — one Indonesian, four Yemenis and one East Asian — for suspected links to militant groups including Daesh, police had said in a statement on Sunday.
Speaking on Tuesday, Malaysia’s police chief said the four Yemenis were plotting an attack on Arab royalties.
“Four Yemenis, apart from their role involving in producing false travel documents they are also involved in distributing drugs... and they are also planning to attack the Arab royalties during the visit in Kuala Lumpur, so we got them in the nick of time,” Inspector General of Police Khalid Abu Bakar told reporters.
The Yemenis were arrested in Serdang and Cyberjaya — near the capital Kuala Lumpur — for suspected links to a Yemeni insurgent group, Malaysian police had said on Sunday.
Police seized multiple international passports from the four, along with 270,000 ringgit ($60,742.41) in different currencies which were suspected to be channelled to the insurgent group.
The UN has said Yemen now poses the largest food insecurity emergency in the world, with an estimated 7.3 million people needing immediate help, while more than 10,00 people have been killed in the conflict.

Hundred detained in Malaysia
Malaysia has arrested hundreds of people with suspected militant links during recent years.
The Southeast Asian nation has been on high alert since suicide bombers and gunmen linked to Daesh launched multiple attacks in Jakarta, the capital of neighboring Indonesia, in January 2016.
A grenade attack on a bar on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur in June last year wounded eight people. Daesh claimed responsibility for the attack.
Two of the seven arrested in late February — a Malaysian and an Indonesian — were planning to launch a large-scale attack using a “vehicle-borne improvised explosive device,” the police have said.
(Reporting by A. Ananthalakshmi and Rozanna Latiff)


Two suicide bombers kill three in north Nigeria mosque

Updated 22 April 2018
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Two suicide bombers kill three in north Nigeria mosque

KANO: Two suicide bombers killed three Muslim worshippers in a mosque in a northeast Nigerian town still being rebuilt after virtual destruction by Boko Haram in 2014, sources told AFP Sunday.
The bombers, a man and a woman, detonated their explosives inside the mosque during morning prayers on Saturday in the town of Bama in Borno state.
The pair "blew themselves up in a mosque while people were praying, killing three people," said Baba Shehu Gulumba, Bama local government chairman.
A senior military officer in Bama confirmed the death toll, adding that nine people were also injured.
"Some of the injured are in a critical condition and may hardly make it. They have been transferred to Maiduguri for better medical care," said the military officer, who asked not to be named.
The attack came two weeks after residents began returning to the town which was destroyed by Boko Haram four years ago.
Bama, a major trading hub on the road to Cameroon and home to 270,000 people, was captured in September 2014, forcing residents to flee to Maiduguri, the state capital.
When it was retaken by the Nigerian military in March 2015, 85 percent of the town had been demolished by the jihadists.
Borno state officials said it would require 40 billion naira (94 million euros, $111 million) to rebuild the town, a staggering amount in the impoverished region.
According to officials 11,000 homes had been rebuilt which residents said represent one-third of those destroyed.
On April 5 the state's information commissioner Mohammed Bulama said 1,200 people had returned to the town in a phased resettlement of the 100,000 displaced residents living in camps in Maiduguri.
Boko Haram has been notorious for suicide attacks on civilian and military targets in response to army offensives that have put pressure on the militant group.
Recent days have seen a lull in such attacks.
However on Friday 10 people including four militia fighting the militants were injured when two female suicide bombers attacked Amarwa village in Konduga district, 38 kilometres from Maiduguri, according to militia sources.