Saudi general: Internet recruiting of young people by terrorists is ‘most dangerous’

Prince Faisal bin Mohammed
Updated 10 March 2017
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Saudi general: Internet recruiting of young people by terrorists is ‘most dangerous’

JEDDAH: Brig. Gen. Prince Faisal bin Mohammed bin Nasser Al-Saud, lecturer at Al-Imam University in Riyadh, said that terrorists’ material capabilities are not equal to those of states and terrorists, whether individually or within organizations, can never eliminate states.
His statements were made in a lecture delivered on Thursday at King Faisal Conference Center at King Abdulaziz University.
Prince Faisal stressed that “the effect of terrorism on the political dimension of national security lies in weakening the confidence of citizens in their country and endangering its independence and sovereignty.”
He also brought attention to the dangerous trend of terrorists resorting to the Internet to brainwash susceptible people.
Brainwashing has two elements: Targeting and instigating, the prince pointed out.
Terrorist groups choose young people, usually in the 15-to-25-age range, to recruit them to carry out terrorist operations.
The targeted groups are most often socially marginalized, the poor and the less educated who harbor hostility toward the state. Also targeted are people with mental problems.
The traditional brainwashing process consists of four stages, the prince said.
The first is isolating the targeted people with whom terrorists start forging ties and whom they teach hatred toward the West, in addition to instilling false patriotism.
During the second stage, the instigators works to change the ideology of the targeted people through the use of images and videos that charge the ruler with infidelity.
The third stage targets individuals and accuses the state and other citizens of being infidels and in which they are required to swear allegiance to the “emir” of the terrorist group.
The last stage of the process is that of confirmation of affiliation, and it includes taking the targeted persons to the areas under the influence of the group and forcing them to undergo military training.
“Some terrorist organizations resort to lone wolves, fearing lack of seriousness on the part of the targeted persons or to avoid having many people caught by security officers. A would-be member is assigned a limited terrorist act that he usually carries out alone, but these operations often fail,” Prince Faisal said.


FaceOf: Homam Hashem, CEO of Saudi Arabia's Kafalah Fund

Homam Hashem
Updated 47 min 10 sec ago
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FaceOf: Homam Hashem, CEO of Saudi Arabia's Kafalah Fund

  • Hashem studied computer information systems, receiving his bachelor’s degree from King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals in 1992
  • He began his career in 1993 as a systems analyst and programmer at the head office of the Banque Saudi Fransi in Riyadh

Homam Hashem is the chief executive officer at the Kafalah Fund, a financing guarantee program for small- and medium-sized enterprises.

On Saudi’s 88th National Day, Hashem elaborated on the importance of the Kafalah Fund and how supporting SMEs contributes to the economic reform of the Kingdom in accordance with Vision 2030. 

He said: “One of the main objectives of Vision 2030 is to increase the contribution of the SME private sector to 35 percent of GDP.” He pointed out that small and medium enterprises play an important role in raising financing opportunities and pave the ways to success.

Hashem studied computer information systems, receiving his bachelor’s degree from King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals in 1992. He also holds a diploma in banking operation management from the Institute of Public Administration.

He began his career in 1993 as a systems analyst and programmer at the head office of the Banque Saudi Fransi in Riyadh. A year later, he joined Samba Financial Group as a credit MIS senior manager for four years before moving on to Al-Rajhi Bank to occupy another senior manager post.

Hashem then spent five years simultaneously working for the Arab National Bank as a cards credit cycle manager, and Visa as a risk adviser. From there, he became Al-Yusr Leasing and Financing’s chief operations officer from 2005 to 2013. 

In 2015, he served as chief operations officer at Tayseer Arabian Co. before returning to Al-Yusr as chief credit and collection director.

He served as a board member at Al-Farasha Financial Services and the engineering solutions company ATMATA.