What to do, where to do it: A handy guide to Dubai’s Art Season

Art Dubai 2017 features a line-up of performance art. (Photo courtesy: Manuel Pelmus & Alexandra Pirici)
Updated 13 March 2017
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What to do, where to do it: A handy guide to Dubai’s Art Season

DUBAI: As the world’s art glitterati descend upon the UAE for Art Dubai, the region’s largest art fair, visitors need not worry if they miss the creative event as it is one of a stellar line-up of upcoming cultural activities.
Supported by the Dubai Culture and Arts Authority, Art Season is set to run from March to April 2017 and will feature more than 350 events for every art lover.
Here are the highlights of this year’s creative season.
SIKKA Art Fair
Located in the Al Fahidi Historical Neighborhood from the 11th to the 21st of March, the SIKKA Art Fair showcases the creativity of GCC artists as well as GCC-based artists from all over the globe. With visual arts, performing arts, music and film there is something for people of all ages to enjoy.
Art Dubai 2017
Art Dubai is dubbed the most global art fair in the world, according to organizers, with the 2017 edition hosting 93 galleries from 43 countries showcasing the works of more than 500 artists.
The 11th edition of Art Dubai takes place between March 15-18, 2017, at Madinat Jumeirah, Dubai.
Design Days Dubai
Design Days Dubai is a fair dedicated to collectible furniture and objects presented by international and Middle East galleries.
The 6th edition of the fair is set to run between March 14-17 at Dubai Design District.
Dubai International Calligraphy Exhibition
The 9th edition of the bi-annual Dubai International Calligraphy Exhibition will take place at Wafi Shopping Center in Dubai and will celebrate the power and beauty of calligraphy. By offering workshops and exhibits, visitors will have opportunity to try their hand at this art form and discover its special position in Islamic heritage.
Sharjah Biennial 13
Running from March 10 – June 12, this year’s event is named “Tamawuj,” a noun in Arabic which is defined as a rising and falling in waves.
Sharjah Biennial is organized by the Sharjah Art Foundation and takes place across various venues in the in the city.


Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

Updated 25 May 2019
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Bong d’Or: Korean director wins Cannes’ top prize

  • French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics" wins festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize
  • Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed”

CANNES, France: South Korean director Bong Joon-ho’s social satire “Parasite,” about a poor family of hustlers who find jobs with a wealthy family, won the Cannes Film Festival’s top award, the Palme d’Or, on Saturday.
The win for “Parasite” marks the first Korean film to ever win the Palme. In the festival’s closing ceremony, jury president Alejandro Inarritu said the choice had been “unanimous” for the nine-person jury.
The genre-mixing film had been celebrated as arguably the most critically acclaimed film at Cannes this year and the best yet from the 49-year-old director of “Snowpiercer” and “Okja.”
It was the second straight Palme victory for an Asian director. Last year, the award went to Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters.”
Two years ago, Bong was in Cannes’ competition with “Okja,” a movie distributed in North America by Netflix. After it and Noah Baumbach’s “The Meyerowitz Stories” — another Netflix release — premiered in Cannes, the festival ruled that all films in competition needed French theatrical distribution. Netflix has since withdrawn from the festival on the French Riveira.
The festival’s second place award, the Grand Prize, went to French-Senegalese director Mati Diop’s “Atlantics.” Diop was the first black female director in competition at Cannes.
Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne shared the best director for “Young Ahmed.”
Best actor went to Antonio Banderas for Pedro Almodovar’s “Pain and Glory,” while best actress was won by British actress Emily Beecham for “Little Joe.”
Although few quibbled with the choice of Bong, some had expected Cannes to make history by giving the Palme to a female filmmaker for just the second time.
Celine Sciamma’s period romance “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” was the Palme pick for many critics this year, but it ended up with best screenplay.
In the festival’s 72-year history, only Jane Champion has won the prize in 1993, and she tied with Chen Kaige’s “Farewell My Concubine.”