Top Twitter accounts hacked by Erdogan supporters

A smartphone display shows the Twitter logo in Berlin, Germany. (AP)
Updated 15 March 2017
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Top Twitter accounts hacked by Erdogan supporters

PARIS: Several top Twitter accounts, including those of a German football club, a French ministry and BBC North America, were defaced Wednesday by pro-Turkish hackers with a message slamming “Nazi Germany” and “Nazi Holland.”
“#NaziGermany. #NaziHolland. This is a small #Ottomanslap for you. See you on #April16. I wrote what? Learn Turkish,” read the message, which comes in the midst of a bitter row between Europe and Turkey over Turkish government rallies on European soil.
The message also featured a swastika and was followed by a video showing extracts of speeches by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.
Twitter confirmed the attack.
“We are aware of an issue affecting a number of account holders this morning,” a Twitter spokesperson said, adding the source of the attack had been tracked to a third party application, whose permissions had been removed.
Twitter Counter, an application that monitors Twitter statistics, said its service had been hacked and used as a route into other accounts.
“We have launched an investigation into the matter,” CEO Omer Ginor told AFP.
The French economy ministry confirmed that its account had been hacked but said the issue had been resolved.
BBC North America wrote in a tweet that it had “temporarily lost control of this account, but normal service has resumed.”
Germany’s Borussia Dortmund football club, tennis legend Boris Becker and Amnesty International were also targeted.
The cyberattack comes after Turkish politicians were last week banned by The Netherlands and several German towns from holding rallies to woo expatriate support for an April 16 constitutional referendum on boosting Erdogan’s powers.
The restrictions caused outrage in Turkey with Erdogan accusing Germany and the Netherlands of “Nazi” practices.
Turkey has suspended top-level ties with The Netherlands over the row.


Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

Updated 17 April 2018
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Japan to trial ‘world’s first urine test’ to spot cancer

  • Previous research has shown a new blood test has potential to detect eight different kinds of tumors before they spread
  • The research starts in April and will run until September

TOKYO: A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.
Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.
It will now begin testing the method using some 250 urine samples, to see if samples at room temperature are suitable for analysis, Hitachi spokesman Chiharu Odaira told AFP.
“If this method is put to practical use, it will be a lot easier for people to get a cancer test, as there will be no need to go to a medical organization for a blood test,” he said.
It is also intended to be used to detect paediatric cancers.
“That will be especially beneficial in testing for small children” who are often afraid of needles, added Odaira.
Research published earlier this year demonstrated that a new blood test has shown promise toward detecting eight different kinds of tumors before they spread elsewhere in the body.
Usual diagnostic methods for breast cancer consist of a mammogram followed by a biopsy if a risk is detected.
For colon cancer, screening is generally conducted via a stool test and a colonoscopy for patients at high risk.
The Hitachi technology centers around detecting waste materials inside urine samples that act as a “biomarker” — a naturally occurring substance by which a particular disease can be identified, the company said in a statement.
The procedure aims to improve the early detection of cancer, saving lives and reducing the medical and social cost to the country, Odaira explained.
The experiment will start this month until through September in cooperation with Nagoya University in central Japan.
“We aim to put the technology in use in the 2020s, although this depends on various things such as getting approval from the authorities,” Odaira said.