Only Saudi gallery at Art Dubai 2017 boasts unexpected art

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Updated 16 March 2017

Only Saudi gallery at Art Dubai 2017 boasts unexpected art

Art Dubai 2017, the international summit of the arts, has opened with a record-breaking bang with galleries from 43 countries showcasing the best of the global scene.
With 93 galleries representing more than 500 artists, one gallery stands out for many Saudis visiting the region’s largest art fair.
Jeddah’s Athr Gallery is the only gallery from Saudi Arabia present at Art Dubai, and is drawing interest from passersby due to its unique collection.
Founded by Hamza Serafi and Mohammed Hafiz in 2009, Athr represents Middle Eastern and international artists and showcases an exhibition schedule of international and Saudi contemporary art with the aim of promoting cultural dialogue between the Kingdom and the rest of the world.
The gallery is boasting works by a slew of artists, including Sara Abdu, Ahmad Angawi, Dana Awartani, Farah Behbehani, Ayman Yossri Daydban, Hazem Harb, Ahmed Mater, Moath Al-Ofi, Monira Al-Qadiri, Nasser Al-Salem, Muhannad Shono and Ayman Zedani.
But why is the gallery not joined by other Saudi art houses?
“There is criteria that you have to meet to participate in Art Dubai. So you have to have a specific program, you have to have existed for a certain number of years and we just happen to be the only contemporary gallery that meet the criteria,” curator and artist liaison Maryam Bilal told Arab News.
Despite flying the flag for the Kingdom, Bilal insists “it is not just about pushing Saudi art but it is about pushing specific themes that are relevant to what is happening in our world.”
The booth features contemporary Islamic art by Dana Awartani who creates a visual translation of the Arabic alphabet’s 28 letters.
Ayman Yossri Daydban, a Palestinian artist who grew up in Saudi Arabia, is also featured heavily in the gallery’s booth.
“He uses a lot of mental imagery that we are always looking at, whether it is posters or movie scenes; he discusses issues such as identity and censorship,” Bilal said of the mustard-yellow classic Arabic movie posters with ripped out faces.
Kuwaiti artist Monira Al-Qadiri’s otherworldly work also drew interest at the fair.
“She was influenced by her education and upbringing in Japan, which is why you can see a sci-fi, anime influence in her work,” Bilal said.
Qadiri’s work covers an entire wall of the gallery booth, which has been painted purple and is punctured by a line of protruding, alien-like objects.
“These are 3-D printings of drill bits. The artist comes from Kuwait which is obviously an oil dependent country; before that it was a pearl dependent country so she painted the drill bits in iridescent shades which have the same color scope as pearls and is really asking the question, when people look back 300 years from now what will they think these are?”
The fair, including the Athr gallery booth, is open to the public between March 15-18.


Spider-Man’s Marvel future in peril as Sony deal breaks down

Updated 21 August 2019

Spider-Man’s Marvel future in peril as Sony deal breaks down

  • The Marvel movies have together grossed $22 billion at the global box office
  • A key aspect of that partnership has now broken down

LOS ANGELES: Marvel’s superhero films could lose their most famous character after Sony confirmed Tuesday that talks over its deal to share Spider-Man with the Disney-owned studio have broken down.
The Marvel movies have together grossed $22 billion at the global box office, and British actor Tom Holland’s Spider-Man has become an increasingly central figure in the most lucrative franchise in film history.
But while the teen web-slinger has for decades been the crown jewel of the Marvel comic book empire on which the films are based, Sony owns the character’s movie rights.
He only began appearing in Disney-owned Marvel’s “cinematic universe” after the Hollywood giants stuck an almost-unprecedented, and still highly secretive, 2015 deal to co-produce and split profits across the films.
A key aspect of that partnership has now broken down.
Sony confirmed that Marvel Studios boss Kevin Feige — widely credited with the phenomenal boom in comic book movies of the past decade — will no longer produce Spider-Man films, with a spokesman adding the studio was “disappointed.”
“We hope this might change in the future, but understand that the many new responsibilities that Disney has given him... do not allow time for him to work on IP (intellectual property) they do not own,” the Sony spokesman said in a statement sent to AFP.
The separation makes it “almost certain” that the character Spider-Man will be absent from crossover appearances in future Marvel films, according to Hollywood Reporter journalist Graeme McMillan.
Multiple Hollywood media outlets reported earlier Tuesday that Disney and Sony had failed to agree on financial terms for future Spider-Man films.
According to Deadline, which broke the news, Disney had wanted to significantly increase its financial stake in new Spider-Man movies, while Sony refused to alter existing terms.
Sony said the reports “mischaracterized recent discussions,” but thanked Feige for “the path he has helped put us on, which we will continue.”
In financial terms, Spider-Man is one of the most successful superheroes in movie history.
Holland’s iteration of Spider-Man has delivered box office gold — he has appeared in a total of five Marvel Studios and Sony films since the collaboration deal, which collectively grossed almost $8 billion worldwide.
These included Marvel’s “Avengers: Endgame,” the highest-grossing movie of all time.
At Comic-Con last month, Marvel Studios set out a timeline of films and television shows scheduled for the next two years including new outings for popular characters Thor, Black Widow, Doctor Strange and Loki — but none featuring Spider-Man.
Feige is also expected to be busy overseeing new Marvel franchises acquired by Disney in its purchase of 21st Century Fox, which include the popular “X-Men.”
Sony last year produced an Oscar-winning Spider-Man animation separate from Marvel Studios’ domain, as well as a standalone film centered on popular Spider-Man villain Venom.
Disney did not immediately respond to request for comment.