Saudi Arabia provides $584.4 million relief assistance to Yemenis

Saudi Arabia is among the top 10 countries in the world in terms of the value and volume of aid provided in alleviating the suffering of the needy. (SPA)
Updated 03 April 2017
0

Saudi Arabia provides $584.4 million relief assistance to Yemenis

RIYADH: The King Salman Center for Relief and Humanitarian Aid has provided relief assistance worth $584.4 million to aid Yemeni citizens, according to the Saudi Press Agency (SPA).
Headed by Dr. Abdullah Al-Rabeeah, the center has been developing partnerships with international agencies to help the needy in Yemen, Djibouti and Ethiopia, and is planning to extend aid to other deprived countries.
In an earlier statement, Al-Rabeeah said: “The Kingdom is among the top 10 countries in the world in terms of the value and volume of aid provided in alleviating the suffering of the needy.”
The total amount spent by the Kingdom in relief aid programs during the past four decades has been around $115 billion from which over 90 countries have benefited.
The King Salman Center has now started working on two more projects: Tackling malnutrition among children and pregnant mothers, and provision of water supplies in 15 Yemeni governorates.
The total number of projects directed at Yemeni citizens has reached 123, and the number of partners that have stood by such projects has reached 81, the agency said.
The number of food, security and shelter projects has reached 44 at a cost of $238 million, which benefited 20 million people with the help of 24 partners.
The center has provided 16 projects related to education, family protection and early recovery programs at a cost of $78.17 million, while projects related to health, nutrition and environmental sanitation reached 53 at a cost of $211.48 million.
The number of beneficiaries in the two categories of projects reached 3,914,236 and 27,780,814, respectively, the agency said.
Regarding projects related to communications in emergencies, logistics and coordination of humanitarian operations, the center allocated 10 projects at a cost of $56.95 million. Some 15,657 people benefited from these projects.


Top five trends shaping KSA retail industry

Saudis visit the International Coffee and Chocolate Exhibition held at the Riyadh International Convention and Exhibition Center in the capital Riyadh on December 4, 2017. (AFP)
Updated 16 min 8 sec ago
0

Top five trends shaping KSA retail industry

  • Artificial intelligence can identify consumer preferences with great accuracy

RIYADH: The Kingdom has a vast, young, tech-savvy population that is shifting behavior in Saudi Arabia, according to Ahmed Reda, MENA consumer industry leader for Ernst and Young (EY).
EY worked with more than 200 business leaders, futurists and industry experts through its FutureConsumer.Now program (FCN) to map the buying habits of consumers. “We asked questions such as how will consumers shop, eat, stay healthy, live, use technology, play, work and move in the future?” Reda said.
Here are some of the key trends powering the shift in consumer behavior and the retail industry in the GCC’s largest consumer base.
Data analytics and AI transforming traditional retail models: The new breed of GCC consumer expects a highly personalized experience. This will be even more critical as brand loyalty declines among GCC consumers. As analytics tools become increasingly sophisticated, the value of personalized data will grow. Artificial intelligence can identify consumer preferences with great accuracy.
Brands need to implement omnichannel strategies: In markets such as Saudi Arabia, which has some of the most affluent consumers, omnichannel strategies (any time, any place) are vital for companies to craft a user experience that cuts across online shopping, social media, mobile apps and conventional stores.
Physical stores still have a place: Online shopping has reduced the need for people to visit shops. Physical stores will still be a powerful asset if they are used for more than shopping. Retailers have a portfolio of well-located spaces that can be repurposed.
Rise of e-commerce: Physical stores won’t disappear, but the high penetration of smartphones and digital services has transformed the behavior of GCC consumers.
Value-seeking behavior after VAT: In a market that has been tax-free, the introduction of VAT, even at a relatively low rate of 5 percent, has caused a shift in consumer behavior. The average Saudi consumer is more cost-conscious than ever. Companies that can tap into additional value through economies of scale, or provide greater convenience, will reap the rewards.