Saudi entertainment authority backs World Championship Kickboxing Challenge in Riyadh

Updated 11 April 2017
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Saudi entertainment authority backs World Championship Kickboxing Challenge in Riyadh

RIYADH: The General Entertainment Authority has announced its support for the World Champion Kickboxing Challenge in Saudi Arabia, which will take place on Friday, April 14, at King Saud University in Riyadh.
The kickboxing challenge, organized by Fighting Fit Events, is the first sporting event of its kind in the Kingdom and the latest entertainment option available to people in the country.
The event, which will start at 5 p.m. until 10:30 p.m., will include fights, kata performances and kids’ entertainment.
Saudi Thai boxing champion Saleh Al-Zubi will demonstrate his fighting skills alongside his fellow countryman and Jeet Kune Do champion Abdul Malek Murtadhah.
The event will include interactive events such as sumo competitions. It will end with a world championship contest, with Moroccan Sufian Al-Zuraidi facing Ukrainian Nadim Promovitch.
Attendance is free for those with special needs. Guests can purchase tickets from all Fitness First centers in Riyadh, and online from http://lammt.com/fightingfit/ff. Ticket prices start from SR45 ($12).
A press conference will be organized to brief the media on details of the event at the Disabled Children’s Association Compound in Riyadh on April 12 at 8:30 p.m. Part of the proceeds from the event will go to the Disabled Children’s Association.
For more information about the World Champion Kickboxing Challenge, visit @Roznamah_sa
The General Entertainment Authority is a government-sanctioned body borne out of Vision 2030.
The Authority looks to develop, promote, regulate and fund a competitive entertainment infrastructure in the Kingdom, partnering with government bodies and the private sector.


Fognini tops Lajovic to claim Monte Carlo Masters

Updated 21 April 2019
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Fognini tops Lajovic to claim Monte Carlo Masters

  • Fabio Fognini defeated Dusan Lajovic 6-3, 6-4 in the Monte Carlo Masters final on Sunday
  • Fognini is only the fourth man to win the clay-court event since Nadal’s first of a record 11 wins in 2005

MONACO: Fabio Fognini won the biggest title of his career after beating Dusan Lajovic 6-3, 6-4 Sunday in the Monte Carlo Masters final.
The 13th-seeded Italian’s first title of the year was his ninth overall but first at Masters level.
It came the day after he stunned defending champion Rafael Nadal in straight sets, becoming the first player to beat Nadal here since Novak Djokovic in the 2015 semifinals.
“It has been an incredible week, I will keep working,” Fognini said. “I started the season badly so this is unbelievable.”
After going out in the third round of the Australian Open, Fognini had won only one match and lost six times before this tournament.
Playing here may have given him a boost, however, since he grew up in nearby San Remo — just over the Italian border and a short drive or train ride away along the glittering Mediterranean coast.
The 48th-ranked Lajovic’s run to his first career final was unexpected. But the unseeded Serb rarely threatened in humid, overcast and slightly windy conditions.
Fognini needed a medical timeout to receive treatment to his right foot and right thigh after the fifth game of the second set.
But it did not impede him as he served out the match, clinching victory on his second match point when Lajovic hit a forehand wide.
The players hugged warmly at the net.
The 31-year-old Fognini is only the fourth man to win the clay-court event since Nadal’s first of a record 11 wins in 2005. Djokovic, twice, and Stan Wawrinka also won.
The last Italian before Fognini was Nicola Pietrangeli in 1968.
The 85-year-old Pietrangeli, a two-time French Open winner, stood and applauded as Fognini dropped to his knees to kiss the surface.
Pietrangeli walked gingerly onto the court and the pair hugged. Pietrangeli posed alongside Fognini as he held the trophy
The match started evenly enough, but Fognini broke for a 4-2 lead when Lajovic made an unforced error on forehand. Fognini then held his serve with a typically flamboyant one-handed, cross-court backhand to take control.
Serving for the set, Fognini saved a break point with a forehand winner down the line, and then clinched it with an equally good backhand.
Fognini broke for a 3-2 lead in the second set when Lajovic hit a forehand wide.
After Fognini’s medical timeout, Lajovic missed an easy smash at 30-30 in the next game.
With that miss, his slim hopes faded.