Daesh tried to use woman suicide bomber in foiled Pakistan Easter plot: Army

Noreen Leghari, a would-be Daesh female suicide bomber, is seen in a video confession shown during a news conference by Maj. Gen. Asif Ghafoor, director general of Inter Services Public Relations (ISPR), in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, on Monday. (REUTERS/Faisal Mahmood)
Updated 19 April 2017
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Daesh tried to use woman suicide bomber in foiled Pakistan Easter plot: Army

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan: A female would-be suicide bomber who had pledged allegiance to the Daesh group had planned to carry out an attack on a church in Lahore on Easter Sunday, a Pakistan military spokesman said Monday.
Noreen Leghari, a second year medical student, is in army custody after being captured during a raid overnight Friday that left four soldiers wounded and her male accomplice dead, army spokesman Major General Asif Ghafoor told reporters.
A filmed confession was later shown to reporters in which Leghari, dressed in a veil, said: “We were provided equipment on April 1, including two suicide vests, four hand grenades and bullets.
“We were told to use these jackets to attack a church on Easter and I was supposed to be used as a suicide bomber.”
Lahore suffered one of Pakistan’s deadliest attacks on Easter Sunday 2016 — a suicide bomb in a park that killed more than 70 people, including many children, and was claimed by the Jamaat ul Ahrar faction of the Pakistani Taliban.
Pakistan has seen a surge in militant attacks this year that have dented optimism after the country appeared to be making strong gains in its decade-and-a-half long war on militancy.
But Ghafoor said that since launching a new nationwide military operation in February, the army had killed some 108 militants while 558 had been captured or surrendered — including Ehsanullah Ehsan, the former spokesman of the Jamaat-ul-Ahrar.
“The former spokesman of Jamaat ul Ahrar and the Pakistani Taliban Ehsanullah Ehsan has surrendered himself to security forces. He’s not the only one. We will share further details in the coming days,” he said. He did not indicate when Ehsan had handed himself in or give any further details.


Kabul rejects reports of secret border deal with Pakistan

Updated 50 min 49 sec ago
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Kabul rejects reports of secret border deal with Pakistan

  • The Durand Line Agreement was signed between British India and Afghanistan in 1893

KABUL: Kabul on Thursday rejected reports that it has secretly recognized the disputed Durand Line as the official border with Pakistan to persuade Islamabad to bring the Afghan Taliban to the negotiating table. The reports, citing Afghan analysts, emerged amid a series of visits by Pakistani and Afghan authorities aimed at restoring bilateral ties, and the killing of Pakistani Taliban leader Mullah Fazalullah in a US drone strike in Afghanistan.
The reports coincided with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s announcement of a truce over the Eid period with the Afghan Taliban, which declared a three-day cease-fire but has resumed its attacks since Sunday night, killing dozens of troops.
An Afghan government delegation led by National Security Advisor Hanif Atmar visited Pakistan on Wednesday to discuss what Afghan officials said was implementation of security and peace plans reached months ago between the two countries.
The visit led to reports that Atmar had struck a deal with Pakistan to abandon Afghanistan’s historical claim over the Durand Line in return for Islamabad’s help in persuading the Taliban to begin talks with Kabul, and a vow to not derail parliamentary elections slated for October and the presidential vote next year.
“Baseless reports about the supposed Durand Line are changing hands on social media,” Atmar wrote, adding that no such discussions have taken place with any Pakistani official. 
The Durand Line is an issue that belongs to all Afghans, and no government “has the right” to talk about it, he said.
The Durand Line Agreement was signed between British India and Afghanistan in 1893. Since its creation in 1947, Pakistan has maintained that the treaty is binding and forms the border between it and Afghanistan.
But no Afghan government has recognized the line as the official border, and the issue has been a historical source of dispute between the two countries.