Indians #BoycottSnapchat after CEO allegedly calls country ‘poor’

Indian Twitter users have hit back by calling for a Snapchat boycott. (File photo: AFP)
Updated 18 April 2017
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Indians #BoycottSnapchat after CEO allegedly calls country ‘poor’

DUBAI: Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel and his supermodel fiancée Miranda Kerr are facing backlash in India after reports that Spiegel allegedly said the country was “poor,” according to a lawsuit.
The CEO’s alleged comments were, according to the lawsuit, made in September 2015 and became public after a court recently ordered that the lawsuit filed by former employee Anthony Pompliano be unsealed.
Pompliano claims that Spiegel’s alleged remarks were made in reference to the app’s poor performance in India and Spain.
“This app is only for rich people,” the lawsuit alleges Spiegel said. “I don’t want to expand into poor countries like India and Spain,” he allegedly added.
Indian Twitter users have hit back by calling for a Snapchat boycott and posting one-star reviews of the popular app.
Some social media users have even targeted Kerr with angry messages, often replete with explicit language.
“Tell your f*ing scumbag of a man to think before speaking,” one person commented on Kerr’s Instagram. “So what if everyone living in India is not as rich as him. His dumb app is beneath us.”
On Monday, the hashtag #BoycottSnapchat garnered more than 35,000 unique tweets, according to the Huffington Post.


In a statement to CNN, the company labelled the claim “ridiculous” and called Pompliano a “disgruntled former employee.”
“Obviously Snapchat is for everyone,” the company said in its statement. “It’s available worldwide to download for free.”

According to Reuters, Shares of Snap (SNAP.N) fell 1.5 percent on Monday as the backlash mounted.

The dip put Snap on track to close at its lowest level in nearly a month, a bad sign following its $3.4 billion public listing that was the hottest by a technology company in three years.


According to the Pew Research Center, only 17 percent of Indians citizens are smartphone users, however, a study by Ericsson estimates that the country could have 1.4 billion mobile subscribers by 2021.
Indo-Asian News Service reported that there are four million Snapchat users in India.


Facebook to clearly label political advertising in Britain, CTO says

Updated 26 April 2018
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Facebook to clearly label political advertising in Britain, CTO says

LONDON: Facebook will introduce new measures to boost transparency around adverts in Britain by June this year and require political ads to be clearly labelled, the firm’s Chief Technology Officer told a British parliamentary committee.
In a written submission to the UK parliament’s media committee, Mike Schroepfer said those wanting to run political adverts would have to complete an authorization process and the messages would also have to display who paid for them.
Facebook has said that the personal information of about 87 million users might have been improperly shared with political consultancy Cambridge Analytica, which worked on Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential election campaign.
Lawmakers have also raised concern over the use of social media in Britain’s referendum decision to leave the European Union in 2016.
“I want to start by echoing our CEO, Mark Zuckerberg: what happened with Cambridge Analytica represents a breach of trust, and we are deeply sorry. We made mistakes and we are taking steps to make sure it doesn’t happen again,” Schroepfer wrote.
Earlier this month, Zuckerberg apologized to US senators for issues that have beset Facebook, including shortcomings over data protection.
But the 33-year-old Internet mogul managed to deflect any specific promises to support any congressional regulation of the world’s largest social media network and other US Internet companies.
Schroepfer, who was appearing before the British media committee on Thursday, said it was clear Facebook had not done enough to ensure its tools from “potentially being used for harm” or take a broad enough view of its responsibility.
“That was a mistake,” he wrote.