Syrian photographer praised for saving child after convoy bombing

Syrian photographer Abd Alkader Habak has been praised online for setting aside his camera to save a young child. (Photo courtesy: CNN/ Muhammad Alrageb)
Updated 19 April 2017
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Syrian photographer praised for saving child after convoy bombing

DUBAI: Syrian photographer Abd Alkader Habak has been praised online for setting aside his camera to save a young child after a bomb hit a convoy of buses carrying evacuees from a village, killing 126 people, including 68 children.
Habak told CNN that he briefly lost consciousness during the blast but when he regained his senses, put his camera down and began checking bodies to check if the victims were still alive.
“The scene was horrible — especially seeing children wailing and dying in front of you,” Habak told CNN. “So I decided along with my colleagues that we’d put our cameras aside and start rescuing injured people.”
The first child he checked was already dead but Habak came upon a young boy who was barely breathing.
Picking him up, he ran toward a nearby ambulance and was captured on camera by another photographer, Muhammad Alrageb.
“This child was firmly holding my hand and looking at me,” Habak said.
Algareb said he also helped the injured but then returned to taking photos.
“I wanted to film everything to make sure there was accountability,” he told CNN.
The photograph has garnered praise online.
“Syrian photographer Abd Alkader Habak @AbdHabak, in the attack bombing near Aleppo ... RESPECT!” one person tweeted.


Another said: “Free Syrian journalist Abd Alkader Habak rescuing a child from Fua. No words.”

 


Facebook to clearly label political advertising in Britain, CTO says

Updated 26 April 2018
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Facebook to clearly label political advertising in Britain, CTO says

LONDON: Facebook will introduce new measures to boost transparency around adverts in Britain by June this year and require political ads to be clearly labelled, the firm’s Chief Technology Officer told a British parliamentary committee.
In a written submission to the UK parliament’s media committee, Mike Schroepfer said those wanting to run political adverts would have to complete an authorization process and the messages would also have to display who paid for them.
Facebook has said that the personal information of about 87 million users might have been improperly shared with political consultancy Cambridge Analytica, which worked on Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential election campaign.
Lawmakers have also raised concern over the use of social media in Britain’s referendum decision to leave the European Union in 2016.
“I want to start by echoing our CEO, Mark Zuckerberg: what happened with Cambridge Analytica represents a breach of trust, and we are deeply sorry. We made mistakes and we are taking steps to make sure it doesn’t happen again,” Schroepfer wrote.
Earlier this month, Zuckerberg apologized to US senators for issues that have beset Facebook, including shortcomings over data protection.
But the 33-year-old Internet mogul managed to deflect any specific promises to support any congressional regulation of the world’s largest social media network and other US Internet companies.
Schroepfer, who was appearing before the British media committee on Thursday, said it was clear Facebook had not done enough to ensure its tools from “potentially being used for harm” or take a broad enough view of its responsibility.
“That was a mistake,” he wrote.