4,000-year-old funerary garden discovered in Luxor

A handout picture released by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities on May 3, 2017, shows the remains of a nearly 4,000 year old model garden following its discovery at the Draa Abul Nagaa necropolis on the west bank of the Nile River in the southern city of Luxor. (AFP PHOTO / HO / EGYPTIAN MINISTRY OF ANTIQUITIES)
Updated 05 May 2017
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4,000-year-old funerary garden discovered in Luxor

CAIRO: Egypt’s Antiquities Ministry said that a Spanish archaeological mission has discovered a nearly 4,000-year-old funerary garden in the southern city of Luxor.
In a Wednesday statement, the ministry said the rectangular-shaped garden was found during excavations in an open courtyard of a rock-cut tomb belonging to the Middle Kingdom of ancient Egypt.
The garden is divided into four squared sections. Each covers 30 square cm and is believed to have contained different kinds of plants and flowers.
The head of the Ancient Egyptian Antiquities Sector, Mahmoud Afifi, said the discovery is the first of its kind in the area.


Kosovan women returned from Syria face house arrest

Updated 52 min 23 sec ago
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Kosovan women returned from Syria face house arrest

  • Four alleged militants, all men, were arrested the moment they were brought to the country
  • The state prosecution said all 32 repatriated women are under investigation

PRISTINA: Kosovo prosecutors have requested the house arrest of 16 women repatriated from Syria, saying they are suspected of joining or taking part as foreign fighters there.

The women appeared on Wednesday in court in Pristina, a day after 10 other women were put under house arrest. None have been charged with a crime.

Four alleged militants, all men, were arrested the moment they were brought to the country.

The women and children were sent to the Foreign Detention Centre in the outskirts of Pristina but were freed to go home after 72 hours.

Ten women were seen entering Pristina Basic Court in a police escort on Tuesday. The court said in a statement later that they had been placed under house arrest on charges of joining foreign armed groups and terrorist groups in Syria and Iraq from 2014 to 2019.

The state prosecution said all 32 repatriated women are under investigation and more of them are expected to appear in front of judges on Wednesday. The prosecution has yet to file charges.

After the collapse of Islamic State’s self-declared caliphate in Syria and Iraq, countries around the world are wrestling with how to handle militants and their families seeking to return to their home countries.

Kosovo's population is nominally 90 percent Muslim, but the country is largely secular in outlook. More than 300 of its citizens travelled to Syria since 2012 and 70 men who fought alongside militant groups were killed.

Police said 30 Kosovan fighters, 49 women and eight children remain in the conflict zones. The government said it plans to bring back those who are still there.

International and local security agencies have previously warned of the risk posed by returning fighters. In 2015, Kosovo adopted a law making fighting in foreign conflicts punishable by up to 15 years in prison.

On Saturday, 110 Kosovar citizens — the four alleged foreign fighters, 32 women and 74 children — were returned to Kosovo with assistance from the United States, the first such move for a European country.

Authorities say there are still 87 Kosovar citizens in Syria.