85-year-old dies on Everest during world record bid

In this photograph taken on February 10, 2017, Nepalese mountaineer Min Bahadur Sherchan speaks during an interview with AFP in Katmandu. (AFP / Prakash Mathema)
Updated 06 May 2017
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85-year-old dies on Everest during world record bid

KATMANDU: An 85-year-old ex-Gurkha who was attempting to reclaim his title as the world’s oldest person to summit Mount Everest died at base camp on Saturday.
Min Bahadur Sherchan was on a bid to reclaim a title that he lost to Japanese mountaineer Yuichiro Miura in 2013.
“He passed away at the base camp today at 5:14pm,” Gyanendra Shrestha, an official with the tourism ministry who is at the 5,380 meters (17,600 feet) camp, told AFP.
The former soldier became the world’s oldest climber to summit Everest in 2008 when he was 76, but he lost the record five years later when Miura summited the 8,848-meter peak at the age of 80.
Speaking to AFP this year before returning to Everest, the slightly hard of hearing grandfather said he just wanted to prove to himself that he could still make it to the top of the world.
“My aim is not to break anybody’s record, this is not a personal competition between individuals. I wish to break my own record,” Sherchan told AFP from Katmandu in February.
Sherchan’s death is the second fatality of the spring climbing season on Everest, which runs from late April to the end of May.
Experienced Swiss climber Ueli Steck died last month when he fell from a steep ridge during an acclimatization climb.
Nearly 750 people will be attempting to reach the summit of the world’s highest peak during the narrow window of good weather that usually falls in mid-May.
Hundreds of climbers have been on Everest for weeks to acclimatize before making a bid for the top.
This year is particularly crowded as it is the last chance for climbers who were forced off the mountain by the devastating 2015 earthquake to use their extended permits. This has rasied concerns about dangerous traffic jams on the mountain.
Mountaineering is a major revenue earner for impoverished Nepal, home to eight of the world’s 14 peaks over 8,000 meters.


Need to vent some anger? Jordan opens ‘Axe Rage Rooms’

Updated 18 April 2019
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Need to vent some anger? Jordan opens ‘Axe Rage Rooms’

  • People can demolish old items as well as smash plates and glasses — but for the price of $17
  • So-called rage rooms have been opening up around the world

AMMAN: In an underground room in Amman, a small group of Jordanians swing giant hammers at an old television, computer and printer, wrecking the machines, and then hit a car windscreen, shattering the glass into tiny pieces.
In the “Axe Rage Rooms,” people can vent their anger and frustration by demolishing old items as well as smashing plates and glasses.
“This is simply a place to break things and vent,” co-founder and general manager Ala’din Atari said. “A place where people come when they’re looking for a new experience... walking into a room with various items which they can break.”
So-called rage rooms have opened around the world, drawing visitors who want let their hair down and unleash some anger.
At the “Axe Rage Rooms,” where the experience costs $17, participants wearing protective suits and helmets wrote the issues bothering them on a blackboard — “ex-girlfriends,” “boss” and “all boyfriends,” the words becoming the targets of their anger.
Atari said his venue, which has seen about 10 clients a day in the month since it opened, had a space for couples, where the pair enter two rooms separated by a reinforced glass window.
“I wanted to try something new and...it was great,” said Ayla Alqadi, 23, after chucking old kitchenware at the window — behind which stood a friend.
“I felt like I had extra energy, it was a way to channel all the negativity inside, everything you feel inside you can release here.”