‘Tea’-totaller? Find out which nations drink the least, most tea

A cup of tea, or three, in the morning can go a long way in helping you prepare for the day. (File photo: Reuters)
Updated 10 May 2017
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‘Tea’-totaller? Find out which nations drink the least, most tea

DUBAI: A cup of tea in the morning can go a long way in helping you prepare for the day but there are some nations which don’t fancy a cuppa and some which are tea mad, a report by the Telegraph published Monday shows.
According to the report, which uses 2011 data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations — the latest available, Lesotho, Haiti and Cuba are tea averse, with a consumption rate that rounds out to 0.0kg per person per year.
On the other hand, the world’s top tea-loving nation is Paraguay, with the average citizen drinking their way through 12.22kg of tea in a typical year.
Matte, a caffeine-rich infusion also popular in Syria, accounts for a majority of that figure, the newspaper reports.
Rounding out the top three are Uruguay and Argentina.
Meanwhile, Kuwait and Turkey come in at the seventh and eights spots, respectively.
The world’s top 15 tea-loving nations are:
1. Paraguay — 12.22kg per person per year
2. Uruguay — 9.66kg per person per year
3. Argentina — 6.05kg per person per year
4. Kenya — 3.24kg per person per year
5. The Gambia — 3.22kg per person per year
6. Djibouti — 3.2kg per person per year
7. Kuwait — 3.2kg per person per year
8. Turkey — 3.11kg per person per year
9. Mauritania — 2.63kg per person per year
10. Malta — 2.24kg per person per year
11. Afghanistan — 2.17kg per person per year
12. United Kingdom — 2.06kg per person per year
13. Morocco — 2kg per person per year
14. Brazil — 1.99kg per person per year
15. Macao — 1.97kg per person per year


Number of life coaches growing in Saudi Arabia

Saudi transformation life coach Waleed Arab. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
Updated 14 January 2019
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Number of life coaches growing in Saudi Arabia

  • “Your body listens to your thoughts,” said Arab, adding that life coaching is very different from counseling

JEDDAH: Sometimes in life people need a helping hand, some physically, others financially, but increasingly emotionally.
YouPositive, a Jeddah-based online life coaching platform, offers that help. Pioneers in online life coaching, they are seeking to bridge the gap between counseling, self-help and technology.
On Saturday, they hosted the first of a series of January events at the City Hub in Al-Nahda district.
Founder and CEO Zahra Al-Mohanna said: “YouPositive is pioneering a marketplace for life coaching, with technological solutions for service providers and clients alike.
“We have created a solution that suits Saudi and Middle Eastern culture, where you can find a coach wherever you are and at your leisure. We pick the right service providers via background checks and interviews, as well as referrals from their clients.”
She added: “YouPositive serves individuals and companies equally, with coaching programs tailored to their needs.”
Saudi life coach Waleed Arab was at the City Hub event to give a lecture, called My Emotions. In it, he tried to shed light on how to understand emotions.

Body and emotions
During his lecture, Arab explained the limbic system and its function, to explain the link between the body and emotions.
“Your body listens to your thoughts,” said Arab, adding that life coaching is very different from counseling.
“A life coach is not a certified person, who can give you medication or anything that may effect your health. Coaching is a psychological tool. The coach paves the way for you to reach your goals.”
He also highlighted the growing popularity of life coaching in the Kingdom. “We are getting there. We have just started, but we have a good number of certified life coaches in Saudi Arabia.”

Specific area of mind
Life coaching is important, explained Arab, because: “We are tapping into a very specific area of the mind, looking to enlighten the person about what is missing in their current mindset. You can examine areas you had not discovered before.
“Just imagine yourself living in a dark room. A coach will help enlighten you and your senses, and show you that there is much more outside for you to explore.”
The reaction to YouPositive, and their January program, has been largely upbeat.
“Life coaches help us improve by changing the way we think,” said Radhya Bahamdoun, an attendee at Arab’s lecture.