Global stars descend on Morocco’s Mawazine festival

US singer Lauryn Hill performs during the 16th Mawazine World Rhythms International Music Festival in Rabat, Morocco on Monday. (Reuters)
Updated 17 May 2017

Global stars descend on Morocco’s Mawazine festival

RABAT, Morocco: Music lovers in Morocco are getting a taste of the best in both regional and international music at this year’s Mawazine festival.
From US singers Lauryn Hill, Nile Rodgers and Wiz Khalifa to British stars Ellie Goulding and Sami Yusuf, Lebanese singer Nawal Al-Zoghbi and Egyptian star Tamer Hosny, the 16th Mawazine World Rhythms International Music Festival currently underway in Rabat is a rare musical bonanza.
Al-Zoghbi, who opened the “Lebanese Nights” at the festival, said she is honored to participate in the international festival.
She performed on most of her famous songs, including “Enaik Kadabeen” and “Tuwalaa.”
Headlining the OLM Souissi stage in Rabat, this was the second concert by Hill in the Arab world — her last being a 2015 show at the Carthage Festival in Tunisia.
Wearing a Fez cap, black and white polka dotted shirt, oversized sunglass and earrings, the 41-year-old rapper performed a set of 19 songs.
This year, the rest of the line up includes Anoushka Shankar, Rod Stewart, Demi Lovato, Syrian Badr Rami, Greek musician Eleftheria Arvanitaki, Peruvian singer Susana Baca, Tunisia’s Lofti Bouchnak, Spanish dancer and choreographer Rafael Amargo and Lebanese performer Jahida Wehbe. George Wassouf will close the festival on Saturday.


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.