Jeddah United-Syriana, Pilipinas-Social vs. Egypt in Intercultural Basketball

Saudi community basketbal team. (AN photo)
Updated 17 May 2017
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Jeddah United-Syriana, Pilipinas-Social vs. Egypt in Intercultural Basketball

JEDDAH: From six starters the field is down to four and Thursday’s knockout semifinals will determine the two to battle it out for the championship crown in the 2nd Open Intercultural Basketball Tournament.
Will defending champion Team Pilipinas-Social Café of coach Francis Magat find its best form to retain the title? Can Jeddah United handle the pressure in its bid for a seven-game title sweep? Will there be surprises from Syriana IKK or the Egypt community basketball team?
These are the story lines in the semifinal games pitting Jeddah United against Syriana at 8:30 p.m. and Pilipinas-Social Café against Egypt at 10:30 p.m.
The semifinal cast was set after the concluding elimination round games at the weekend at the spanking new Jeddah United sport complex basketball court.
Though they did their part of the bargain Syriana’s fate was in the hands of Egypt, which surprised everyone when it took down Lebanese community team, one of the pre-tournament favorites, in the second game on Friday.
Thursday, Jeddah United finished as the No. 1 team on 5-0 after beating the Filipinos 72-67 while Hassan Zeineddein’s Syriana trounced Saudi community team 71-58.
The must-win against the Saudis done, Syriana had to wait for the result of the Egypt-Lebanese tiff if they are to continue in the knockout stage of the tournament .
Fortunately for Syriana, Egypt opened the door to the semis as it bravely battled from 20 points down to beat the Lebanese 68-66 in a thrilling game.
The Egyptians tied the game at 50-all to end the third quarter after trailing the Lebanese by as many as 20 points.
A basket from the perimeter by Mohammed Abulmajd and a split free throw by Mohammed Hamdi gave the Egyptians a 65-61 lead with 2:31 to play in the fourth quarter after the Lebanese had closed within 62-61.
The Lebanese were to threaten two more times at 65-64 and 66-65, and with the score at 68-66 to Egypt, time down to 10.3 seconds, the Lebanese had a chance to steal the game but American import Mo Abdulaleem flubbed his free throws, Ahmad Kheir missed a field goal and Mohammed Ziden from under the basket in the last second.
The result put Egypt at 3-2 in a tie with Philippines and Lebanese at 2-3 in a deadlock with Syriana. But Syriana went through to the last four by virtue of the winner over the other rule.
The event is an annual project of Event Manager Mohammad Shobain with support from Consultant-adviser Mohamed Bayoumi, a friend of the Filipino community and recipient of the Presidential Banaag Award.


Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

Updated 14 November 2018
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Meet the Saudi Arabian businessman shaping squash’s Olympic dream

LONDON: A Saudi Arabian businessman is driving the bid to get squash included in the Olympics for the first time.
The World Squash Federation has petitioned three times for squash to join the Games, but each bid has been rejected by the International Olympic Committee (IOC). The decision has prompted frustration in the squash community, particularly as sports such as climbing, surfing and skateboarding have been admitted.
Ziad Al-Turki is the Chairman of the Professional Squash Association (PSA) and has done wonders in marketing the game and broadening its appeal. He is now pushing hard for the game to be showcased on the biggest stage of all at the 2024 Olympics Games in Paris.
Squash has huge global appeal, with the men’s singles final in the last Commonwealth Games attracting a TV audience of more than one million.
“Everyone’s ultimate goal is the Olympics,” said Al-Turki. “The main push comes from the World Squash Federation (WSF) and for many years they were stuck in their ways. We changed a lot at the PSA and ticked every box with the IOC. The WSF just stayed stagnant and didn’t do anything. They didn’t want to put our hand in their hand and work together.”
Relations between the PSA and the WSF came to a head in 2015 in the wake of squash losing out to wrestling for a spot at the 2020 Olympics. A statement from the PSA described the then president of WSF, Narayana Ramachandran, as an “embarrassment to the sport.”
“Nothing could happen with the president of the WSF. Nothing would change. It was just a one-man show. We tried to help but he wouldn’t accept any help,” Al-Turki said. “We have a new president now and they are all very keen,” he added.
Jacques Fontaine is the new president and at his coronation in 2016 he encouragingly said “the Olympic agenda remains a priority.”
“The WSF love the sport and they understand the needs of the IOC,” said Al-Turki.
“They understand the PSA is at a completely different level to the WSF and we’ve now joined forces and are working together. Hopefully 2024 will be the year squash is in the Olympics. Right now, the way we are working together is the strongest collaboration ever and hopefully we can tick all the boxes for the IOC.
“We ticked all the right bodies as a professional association but the WSF didn’t. Now they are putting their hands in ours and we will tick all the right boxes for the ICO.”
Al-Turki, once described as the Bernie Ecclestone of squash, has certainly transformed the sport since he took up office in 2008.
“When I joined the PSA we didn’t have any media coverage,” he said. “Right now we are live in 154 countries. the women’s tour has just grown stronger and stronger — the income has gone up by 74 percent.
“I just love the squash players. I think they are incredible athletes are are some of the fittest athletes in the world. I felt they deserved better and I wanted them to have better.
“I don’t think we’ll be able to reach the levels of football and tennis in terms of exposure and prize money, but I want to reach a level where they will retire comfortably. It’s one of the fastest growing sports in the world right now.
“It’s all about the player and their well being. Nick Matthew retired recently and I think he’s retired comfortably. I think I’ve contributed to this as the income has improved. That’s all I want – nothing more.”