1st All Star Games & Family Fun Day caps MoneyGram 3on3 today

Participants in the MoneyGram 3on3 Championship gather for a group picture. (AN photo)
Updated 18 May 2017
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1st All Star Games & Family Fun Day caps MoneyGram 3on3 today

JEDDAH: The 1st All Star Games & Family Fun Day will take place Friday in a sideshow to the semifinal and championship matches in the MoneyGram 3on3 Championship at the Sheraton Jeddah Hotel Sport Complex basketball court.
The proceedings start at 5 p. m. with the All Star Games at 8 p.m. to pit select players from teams entered in the Juniors Division and Open Non Rated Division of the four weeks long competition sponsored by MoneyGram in cooperation with FCBL (Filipino Community Basketball League).
Thursday, the eight junior teams battled for places in Friday’s semifinal with the winners to clash for the title later Friday. Leading the quarterfinalists is the unbeaten Gray A, which edged out Black B 19-18 during the third week of actions. With Gray A in the round of eight are Green B, Black B, Green A, Black A, Violet A, Yellow A and Yellow B.
Gray A sits at the top of the team standings at 4-0 with Green B, Black B and Green A tied on 3-1. In a four-way logjam on 2-2 are Black A, Violet A, Yellow B and Yellow A.
In other Juniors Division results, its Green A 24 Yellow B 14, Gray B 8 Yellow A 15 and
Green B 25 Black A 13.
Meantime, thrilling games marked the Open Non Rated Division.
New Cabalen Sarawat prevailed in double overtime against the pesky KGT 42-39, Holdup Boyz escaped Pardz 29-28 after a thrilling tussle while AVK Wildboys battled exhaustion to win against Uncle Majid Rice & Toppings 22-21. The Wildboys had to play three consecutive games on the day.
Holdup Boyz of Amboy Sicangco joined idle Ball is Life of Bigger Corpuz at No. 1 of the team standings in the Open Non Rated on 4-0. With 3-1 win-loss card each are Pardz of Jon Apuzardo, Haslo Boyz of Neo Advincula, Chris Melebo’s New Cabalen Lulu and AVK of Jolly Tilo. New Cabalen Sarawat (2-2) of Ruel Bristol and Uncle Majid (1-3) of Louie Jacinto rounded out the quarterfinalists in the division.
Manager Ahmed Khasawneh and Max Paleothorpe helped facilitate the MoneyGram sponsorship of the event which also enjoys the support of Donald Dolloso’s Samahan ng Kabataan sa Jeddah (SNKSJ).
Noel Miguel heads the Organizing Committee as president with Robert Jose as commissioner.
With Miguel and Jose in the Organizing Committee is Tournament Director Jerry Lagrimas. Making up the Technical Committee are: Jess Sales, Zaldy Ramos and Willy Cartagena (play-by-play announcer).


Mohamed Salah’s brilliance and impact better seen off-pitch than on it

Updated 26 April 2018
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Mohamed Salah’s brilliance and impact better seen off-pitch than on it

  • Jurgen Klopp praises the positive impact Mohamed Salah has had on attitudes towards Islam and the Arab World
  • Salah has 43 goals in all competitions this season and is a serious Ballon d'Or contender

LONDON: “Mohamed Salah is the best footballer in the world at the moment,” “Salah is up there with Messi and Ronaldo,” “Salah has the world at
his feet...”
In a world ever more prone to hyperbole and after yet another masterclass from the Egyptian ace, it is not surprising that such grandiose statements get bandied about with the regularity of a Salah goal. The 25-year-old was simply sublime during Liverpool’s 5-2 destruction of Roma on Tuesday night.
He has now scored 43 times this season, has a genuine chance of winning the Ballon d’Or, and with every match looks more deserving of the superstar mantle his admirers have given him.
But while we can sit back and marvel at his talent, all those tributes are perhaps missing the point. We can debate whether he is a world-beater on the pitch, but what is not in doubt is that Salah is a game-changer off it — and that is the true mark of just how impressive he has been since moving to Liverpool.
Go to Anfield for any match now and, once the rousing rendition of “You’ll Never Walk Alone” has died down, it is likely you will next hear the Liverpool fans’ hymn to Salah. Sung to the tune of “Good Enough” by Britpop band Dodgy, it goes like this: “If he’s good enough for you, he’s good enough for me, if he scores another few, then I’ll be a Muslim, too.” Such is the “Salah effect.”
Britain is a hugely fractured country at the moment. The Brexit vote and debate surrounding it has held up a mirror to an island ill at ease with itself, with regressive attitudes to race, religion and immigration out in the open.
That Salah has been welcomed with open arms and lauded in that climate — albeit in a city with a proud tradition of tolerance — is quite something, not least at a time when Islamaphobic attacks in the UK are on the rise and when, as recently as 2016, a national newspaper ran a headline that claimed “1 in 5 Brit Muslims’ sympathy for jihadis.”
The context of the Salah worship evident not just in Liverpool, but also around the country has not been lost on his manager, Jurgen Klopp.
“(The hero status of Salah) is fantastic. It’s exactly what we need in these times,” the German told Channel 4 News.
“To see this wonderful young man, full of joy, full of love, full of friendship, full of everything, in a world where we all struggle a little bit to understand all the things happening around on this planet — so it’s just fantastic.
“He is a Muslim and he is doing all the things that Muslims are doing before a game, washing procedures and stuff like that … like Sadio (Mane) by the way, like Emre Can, by the way; they all do that. Nobody says what we have to be…
“Now we wait, that’s completely normal in a team and that’s how in an ideal world the world would work; we all try to understand each other and deal with all the little strange things for the one or the other.”
Sport sometimes aims for profundity when there is none. Witness any stomach-churning statement of national brilliance during an Olympics, or any underdog story, and you will find people deriving a lot more from some match than the simple “team scores more to win game” narrative that is most set in reality.
But the “Salah effect” has prompted real change off the pitch. From fans singing “I’ll be a Muslim, too” to appreciating the Liverpool talisman simply as a great player regardless of background, the “Egyptian King” is a genuine role model for his country, the region and Islam at a time when the world needs it most.
“We are all kind of ambassadors and sometimes we fit to that role and sometimes not, and at the moment Mo is the perfect ambassador for Egypt, for the whole Arabic world. I love that,” Klopp said.
So it is immaterial whether Salah wins the Champions League for Liverpool, beats Ronaldo to the Ballon d’Or or leads Egypt deep in the World Cup — he has already done more than most footballers do.
Should the positive image of both Arabs and Muslims he has created endure, then that will be his true mark of greatness.