Algerian-born Sofia Boutella ‘terrified’ by ‘The Mummy’

Sofia Boutella
Updated 08 June 2017

Algerian-born Sofia Boutella ‘terrified’ by ‘The Mummy’

DAMMAM: Sofia Boutella was scared of “The Mummy” — until she got to know the ancient Egyptian princess intimately.
“I think I was terrified to play a monster,” said the former dancer, who has worked with the likes of Rihanna and Madonna.
The Algerian-born actress’ main concern was being typecast in the role.
“I felt like every time I saw an actor play a monster in a movie, with the exception of Boris Karloff, they hadn’t done much afterwards in terms of their career,” she said.
That is why Boutella said “no” to director Alex Kurtzman the first time he offered her the part.
The actress breaks tradition in the new film as Universal Pictures’ first female Mummy.
Her co-star Tom Cruise said the move to make the antagonist a woman gives the story a “fresh and modern take.” “I thought it really made for a fresh and modern take on it that really leads us in to this new universe. Sofia is beautiful, powerful, terrifying, but very alluring; you want to be with her but then you’re scared of her,” he said.
The Mummy reboot stars Cruise as Nick Morton, a soldier of fortune who awakens vengeful Egyptian aristocrat Ahmanet (Boutella) from a slumber that has lasted thousands of years.


Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

Updated 19 August 2019

Alaska man discovers 50-year-old message in bottle from Russian Navy

  • Then Russian Navy Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko wrote the letter when he was a 36-year-old aboard the Sulak
ANCHORAGE, Alaska: A man discovered a 50-year-old letter in a bottle from the Russian Navy on the shores of western Alaska.
Tyler Ivanoff found the handwritten Russian letter early this month while gathering firewood near Shishmaref about 600 miles (966 kilometers) northwest of Anchorage, television station KTUU reported.
“I was just looking for firewood when I found the bottle,” Tyler Ivanoff said. “When I found the bottle, I had to use a screwdriver to get the message out.”
Ivanoff shared his discovery on Facebook where Russian speakers translated the message to be a greeting from a Cold War Russian sailor dated June 20, 1969. The message included an address and a request for a response from the person who finds it.
Reporters from the state-owned Russian media network, Russia-1, tracked down the original writer, Capt. Anatolii Prokofievich Botsanenko, KTUU reported.
He was skeptical he wrote the note until he saw his signature on the bottom.
“There — exactly!” he exclaimed.
The message was sent while the then 36-year-old was aboard the Sulak, Botsanenko said. Botsanenko shed tears when the Russian television reporter told him the Sulak was sold for scrap in the 1990s.
Botsanenko also showed the reporter some souvenirs from his time on the ship, including the autograph of the wife of a famous Russian spy and Japanese liquor bottles, the latter kept over his wife’s protests.
Ivanoff’s discovery of the bottle was first reported by Nome radio station KNOM.