EDITORIAL: Terrorism is terrorism, even when it hits Iran

A still image taken from a video released on the internet by Daesh-affiliated Amaq News Agency, on Wednesday, purports to show a person lying on floor with blood stain in an office said to be inside Iranian parliament in Tehran, Iran. (REUTERS)
Updated 08 June 2017
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EDITORIAL: Terrorism is terrorism, even when it hits Iran

The terrorist attacks that took place at two of Tehran’s most prominent and well-known landmarks — the Parliament and the Khomeini mausoleum — show once again that we are all equally hurt by the evils of extremism.
It also reiterates what we already knew: Daesh monsters do not understand the inviolability of sacred places. To target the Parliament is bad enough but to target a mausoleum is abhorrent. Places where people are buried should and must remain off-limits.
In such circumstances, it is probably wise for Iran to learn from the Saudi experience. Saudi Arabia took a zero-tolerance approach toward those who finance, support or engage in terror acts. As such, Riyadh successfully eliminated the threat of Al-Qaeda when it undertook a murderous campaign against civilians and security forces within the Kingdom.
It is because of this zero tolerance for terrorism from the highest levels in government that Saudi Arabia has joined the world community in order to fight terror and is considered a valuable member in the global fight.
Up until now, Iran had remained free of similar terrorist attacks. For a state that is the biggest supporter of terrorist groups worldwide — whether Al-Qaeda, Hezbollah, Al-Hashd Al-Shabi, the Houthis or the Assad regime — these attacks on Iranian soil should come as a wake-up call. As Tehran picks up the pieces from the attack in Parliament and on the Khomeini mausoleum, it would do well to understand the pain that terror causes, as well as the misery and heartache that it inflicts upon the innocent.
Tehran should also cease blaming others and look within and rethink its philosophy of exporting terror, only then can we all work together for the prosperity of the region.
May all victims of terror, regardless of race or religion, Rest In Peace.


Syria police deploy in south Damascus after Daesh defeat

Updated 22 May 2018
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Syria police deploy in south Damascus after Daesh defeat

DAMASCUS: Syrian police deployed across devastated districts in southern Damascus on Tuesday, according to state media, a day after the government captured the area from the Daesh group.
The government on Monday seized the Yarmuk Palestinian camp and adjacent neighborhoods of Tadamun and Hajjar Al-Aswad, putting Damascus fully under its control for the first time since 2012.
On Tuesday, police units entered Yarmuk and Hajjar Al-Aswad and planted the two-star Syrian flag there, state television reported.
It broadcast images of security forces atop a pockmarked multi-story building in Yarmuk where they had hung the national flag.
They had also plastered pictures of President Bashar Assad and his predecessor and father Hafez.
Other police officers gathered in the ravaged streets below and fired in the air in celebration.
“The police are present round-the-clock,” said one officer interviewed on the state broadcaster.
“Special units are deployed across the camp to help any civilians and protect their belongings,” he said.
It also showed footage from Hajjar Al-Aswad of a convoy of police cars and motorcycles making its way through dusty streets lined with crumbling buildings.
There were no civilians in sight.
Yarmuk, Hajjar Al-Aswad and the nearby district of Tadamun all lie in a southern pocket of Damascus that had escaped regime control for several years.
The government began losing its grip on parts of the capital in 2012, just one year after the conflict in Syria erupted.
But it has made a comeback this year, with Assad using a mix of military pressure and evacuation deals to flush rebels and militants out of Damascus and its outskirts.
His troops and allied Palestinian fighters turned their sights on Yarmuk and the other Daesh-held parts of the capital last month.
Daesh overran Yarmuk in 2015, but the massive Palestinian camp had already been ravaged by years of rebel infighting and government attacks.
Syria’s army announced it had seized Yarmuk from Daesh on Monday.
Several sources, including the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights and a military source close to Damascus, said the capture came after a negotiated withdrawal of Daesh fighters. The government has denied such a deal.