Long history of security incidents, violence at Capitol

Sen. Michael Enzi (R-WY) walks past a U.S. Capitol Police officer standing guard in front of the U.S. Capitol Building. (Getty Images/AFP)
Updated 15 June 2017

Long history of security incidents, violence at Capitol

WASHINGTON: A man with a rifle opened fire on Republican lawmakers at a congressional baseball practice Wednesday near Washington, wounding House GOP Whip Steve Scalize of Louisiana and several others as congressmen and aides dove for cover. The assailant fought a gunbattle with police before being shot and killed.
A congressional aide and a volunteer also were wounded, along with two US Capitol police officers.
A look at previous security incidents at the Capitol or political violence involving members of Congress:
— March 29, 2017: A 20-year-old woman described as “erratic and aggressive” drives a vehicle into a Capitol Police cruiser and is taken into custody, closing down streets near the Capitol for nearly three hours. Shots were fired during the arrest attempt, but the event appeared to be criminal in nature with “no nexus to terrorism,” Capitol Police said. No one was injured.
— March 28, 2016: Police shoot a man after he pulled a weapon at a Capitol checkpoint as spring tourists thronged Washington. Congress was not in session. Police identified the man as 66-year-old Larry Dawson of Tennessee, who was charged with assault with a deadly weapon and assault on a police officer while armed.
— Jan. 14, 2015: A 22-year-old Ohio man is arrested by the FBI in an alleged plot to attack the Capitol in support of the Islamic State terror group. Christopher Lee Cornell of suburban Cincinnati pleaded guilty to three charges, including attempted murder of US officials and employees. Court documents show Cornell said he wanted to attack during President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address.
— Nov. 6, 2014: A former Cincinnati-area bartender is charged with threatening to kill House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. Michael Hoyt, who worked at a country club in Boehner’s suburban community, was accused of threatening to kill Boehner with a gun or by poisoning his drink. A federal judge ruled Hoyt was insane at the time of the offense.
— Oct. 3, 2013: Miriam Carey, a 34-year-old dental hygienist from Connecticut, is shot and killed by Capitol Police officers in her vehicle outside the Hart Senate Office Building. Officers had pursued Carey from the White House, where she made a U-turn at a security checkpoint. Her young daughter was inside the car at the time and was unharmed. Her family later filed a wrongful-death lawsuit against the Secret Service and Capitol Police.
— Jan. 8, 2011: A gunman shoots Rep. Gabby Giffords, D-Arizona, in the head during a shooting rampage at a public event outside a grocery store in Tucson. Six people were killed, and 13 wounded, including Giffords. Jared Loughner, 25, was sentenced to life in prison for the shooting. Giffords resigned from office in 2012.
— Sept. 22, 2006: An armed man runs through the Capitol in an embarrassing security breach after allegedly crashing a sport utility vehicle into a police cruiser. Unarmed employees of the basement flag office subdued the man just before police arrived to arrest him.
— July 24, 1998: A man with a history of mental illness shoots his way into the Capitol building filled with lawmakers and tourists, killing two veteran Capitol Police officers and wounding a tourist. Officer Jacob Chestnut was killed at a first-floor Capitol entrance, and Detective John Gibson died after exchanging fire with gunman Russell Weston inside a suite of offices occupied by then-House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Texas. Weston was then wounded and captured.
— Nov. 7, 1983: A bomb rips through the second floor of the Capitol, damaging a conference room and the offices of Sen. Robert Byrd, D-W.Virginia No one was injured. A caller had phoned The Washington Post warning that a bomb was about to explode. The caller claimed the action was in response to US military aggression in Grenada and Lebanon.
— Nov. 18, 1978: Rep. Leo Ryan, D-Calif., is shot and killed while on an official visit to Guyana. He was investigating the activities of the Peoples Temple group led by Jim Jones, and was ambushed and shot multiple times by cult members while boarding a plane to leave Jonestown. Four others were also killed, three journalists and a defector, followed by a night of mass murder and suicide by more than 900 cult members.
— Jan. 30, 1973: Sen. John Stennis, D-Mississippi, is shot twice by robbers outside his Washington home. The 71-year-old senator survived and returned to the Hill.
— March 1, 1971: A bomb explodes in the men’s room on the Senate side of the Capitol. It destroyed the restroom and a barbershop, but no one was injured. A caller said the bombing was to show opposition to the Vietnam War. The radical Weather Underground claimed responsibility, but no one was prosecuted for the act.
— June 5, 1968: New York Senator Robert F. Kennedy is shot by Sirhan Sirhan, a young Palestinian, at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles moments after declaring victory in the California Democratic presidential primary. Kennedy died the next day. Five other people were injured in the shooting.
— March 1, 1954: Five congressmen are shot on the floor of the House by Puerto Rican nationalists who fired shots from the visitors’ gallery. The lawmakers all recovered. Four assailants were arrested.
— July 12, 1947: Sen. John Bricker, R-Ohio, is shot at twice as he enters the Senate subway. Both shots missed. The gunman was a former Capitol policeman who had lost money when an Ohio building and loan firm was liquidated.
— Sept. 10, 1935: Sen. Huey Long, D-Louisiana, dies in Baton Rouge two days after being shot in the Louisiana state Capitol, allegedly by Dr. Carl Weiss.
— Dec. 13, 1932: A gunman enters the House gallery and demands to address the House on the Great Depression. Rep. Melvin Maas, R-Minnesota, convinced the gunman to drop the loaded pistol before shots were fired.
Compiled by News Researchers Jennifer Farrar and Monika Mathur and Associated Press writer Matthew Daly.


Macron spearheads pressure on Bolsonaro over Amazon fires

Updated 1 min 20 sec ago

Macron spearheads pressure on Bolsonaro over Amazon fires

  • With global leaders gearing up for the G7 summit, which opens Saturday in the western French resort of Biarritz, Macron drew Bolsonaro’s ire by saying the wildfires would be high on the agenda
  • Bolsonaro had earlier blasted Macron for a colonialist mentality, prompting the French president hit back, accusing his Brazilian counterpart of lying in pledges to fight global warming

PARIS: France’s Emmanuel Macron led a growing wave of international pressure on Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro over the fires raging in the Amazon rainforest Friday, telling him Paris would block efforts to seal a major trade deal.
With global leaders gearing up for the G7 summit, which opens Saturday in the western French resort of Biarritz, Macron drew Bolsonaro’s ire by saying the wildfires would be high on the agenda and pledging that delegates would hammer out “concrete measures” to tackle them.
Bolsonaro had earlier blasted Macron for a “colonialist mentality,” prompting the French president hit back, accusing his Brazilian counterpart of lying in pledges to fight global warming.
“Given the attitude of Brazil over the last weeks, the president can only conclude that President Bolsonaro lied to him at the Osaka (G20) summit” in June, a French presidential official said.
As a result, France would oppose a trade deal between the EU and South America’s Mercosur nations, effectively killing any chance of it being ratified, he said.
Moves to prioritize the Amazon wildfires on the G7 agenda won backing from German Chancellor Angela Merkel, with new British Prime Minister Boris Johnson tweeting that the fires were “heartbreaking” and offering help to put them out.
But in a sign of EU disagreement, Germany said Macron’s proposal to block the Mercosur deal was “not the right response.”
“Failing to conclude the Mercosur agreement would not contribute to reducing the clearing of the rainforest in Brazil,” a German government spokesman told AFP.
So far this year, there have been 76,720 forest fires in Brazil — the highest number since 2013, official figures show, with more than half in the Amazon rainforest.
“The Amazon rainforest — the lungs which produce 20 percent of our planet’s oxygen — is on fire,” Macron tweeted late on Thursday, suggesting it be high on the summit agenda.
But Bolsonaro blasted the move to make it a G7 item without any participation by Brazil, saying it reflected a “colonialist mentality.”
The leaders of France, the US, Canada, Britain, Germany, Italy and Japan already face a litany of issues in Biarritz, which is on a security lockdown for the summit.
Macron met Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif earlier Friday for last-minute talks trying to soothe tensions between Tehran and Washington.
A nuclear deal between Western powers and Iran all but collapsed after Donald Trump unilaterally withdrew US support in May 2018, reimposing economic sanctions on Tehran.
“We’re at a critical moment,” Macron warned on Wednesday, acknowledging that Iran is “laying out a strategy” for exiting the 2015 deal.
“President Macron made some suggestions last week to President (Hassan) Rouhani and we believe they are moving in the right direction, although we are not definitely there yet,” Zarif told AFP in an interview.
He said he had a “good discussion” with the French leader, who would now hold talks with other European leaders to seek a way forward.
Macron’s diplomacy is a delicate task, with France seeking to roll back some of the US measures imposed as part of Trump’s policy of “maximum pressure” on Iran, which insists its nuclear program is peaceful.
French diplomats have raised the idea of US waivers on sanctions affecting Iranian oil exports to India and China, or a new credit line for Tehran that could help the struggling economy.
That prompted Trump to accuse Macron of sending Tehran “mixed signals” in his attempt to broker fresh talks between the longtime adversaries.
But Trump appears to be the outlier among America’s G7 partners on Iran, despite speculation that Johnson, who claims a close personal rapport with the US leader, might be more amenable to endorsing his stance.
On Friday, a British diplomatic source said the UK would continue to back the 2015 nuclear deal, which it helped broker, as the “best way” of preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon.
Iran is just one of a host of issues over which G7 members are at loggerheads, upending a formerly cosy club of rich nations.
Trump will arrive in the glitzy beachside resort on Saturday already riled by a new French law increasing taxes on US Internet giants such as Google and Facebook. He is also threatening tariffs on the European automobile sector.
Just before the summit, China fired the latest salvo in its trade war the US, announcing new tariffs on $75 billion of American imports.
But in a sign of the summit’s lowered ambitions, French officials have scrapped the idea of a joint declaration at the end, breaking a longstanding G7 tradition.