Barefoot and alone, children flee brutal S. Sudan war

Unaccompanied children who travelled alone alone from South Sudan to the Ethiopian border, play on swings at the children friendly space of Plan International Nguenyyiel refuge camp in Gambela, Ethiopia, recently. (AFP)
Updated 04 July 2017
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Barefoot and alone, children flee brutal S. Sudan war

NGUENYYIEL REFUGEE CAMP, Ethiopia: Her feet bare and her hometown in flames, Nyadet walked east alone, eating food given to her by strangers and following trails left by others escaping war in South Sudan.
She is 12 years old.
Nine days after she fled bloodshed in the flashpoint town of Malakal last November, Nyadet reached the country’s border with Ethiopia, and crossed over to safety.
“Maybe they are safe,” is all she can say of her mother, father, sister and two brothers, whom she lost track of when the streets of her hometown transformed into a war zone.
South Sudan’s civil war has raged on for the past three years with such viciousness that parts of the country are bereft of food and a third of the population has fled their homes, but few refugees present as vexing a problem as children like Nyadet who escape the conflict alone.
“They are fleeing definitely life-threatening situations,” said Daniel Abate of aid group Save the Children, which helps reunite lost children with their families.
At the Nguenyyiel refugee camp near Ethiopia’s lush western frontier, boys and girls who crossed the border unaccompanied tell tales of murdered families and childhoods shattered by the unremitting violence in South Sudan.
“War happened,” is the description Nyakung, 11, gives for the atrocities she witnessed in the capital Juba, where her mother was left to die inside a blazing hut and three of her brothers were gunned down on a road while running for the safety of a UN base.
Aid agencies are trying to get children like Nyakung back with their families, but humanitarians admit that with the conflict still raging in South Sudan, the odds of these children seeing their loved ones again are slim.
South Sudan’s war, sparked when President Salva Kiir accused his former deputy Riek Machar of plotting a coup in 2013, has been marked by numerous atrocities against civilians despite the presence of thousands of UN peacekeeping troops.
Around 1.8 million South Sudanese have fled the country, making it the fastest growing refugee crisis in the world.
One million of those refugees are children, the UN says, and of that number about 75,000 were either separated from their parents or without any family at all.
Aid workers say they regularly see South Sudanese children straggling across the border, often with an adult stranger, but sometimes by themselves.
“You can tell they are very tired, their clothes (are) worn-out on them, they have not been showered for some time. So, you can see that they’re destitute,” Daniel said.
Nguenyyiel is home to nearly 2,900 children that arrived without any family, who pass their days attending school and playing in a tree-shaded jungle gym.
Chan, 13, escaped Malakal late last year when fighting erupted and the grass hut he lived in was torched.
He then walked for a month until he crossed into Ethiopia.
“I just go the direction where I see a safe place,” he said.
Some, like Nyadet, hope to one-day reunite with their families.
Others hold no such hope.
Chan says he does not know where his parents are but believes they must be dead.
With neither the government nor the rebels honoring a peace deal made two years ago, locating family members of lost children in the chaos of South Sudan is difficult, says Hiwotie Simachew, emergency response manager for aid group Plan International.
Some parents have also likely joined the exodus that has distributed hundreds of thousands of South Sudanese refugees to Uganda, Kenya, Sudan and beyond.
Parents, if they are still alive, could be in refugee camps in any of these countries, or in other settlements in Ethiopia, Hiwotie said.
Plan International and Save the Children have managed to reunite hundreds of youths with their families, but that is just a fraction of the around 31,500 children Ethiopia’s Administration for Refugee and Returnee Affairs says have arrived without their parents.
Even when family members are located, some do not want to take custody of the children.
In one case, aid workers found the uncle of three unaccompanied minors in Australia, but he declined to adopt them, Hiwotie said.
In other instances, it is the children themselves who resist reunion, because they believe that would mean a return to the violence from which they escaped.
“They are refusing to reunify with their family and thinking that, if they show their interest, they will return back to South Sudan,” Hiwotie said.


25 Venezuelan migrants reported missing after boat sinks

Updated 1 min 50 sec ago
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25 Venezuelan migrants reported missing after boat sinks

  • The victims are thought to migrants fleeing Venezuela's worsening political and economic crisis
  • At least nine others from the sunken boat had been pulled alive from the water,
CARACAS, Venezuela: Search teams combed the Caribbean on Thursday for 25 possible Venezuelan migrants missing after a boat sank in rough seas headed to the island of Trinidad, authorities said.
At least nine others from the sunken boat had been pulled alive from the water, while officials said they were struggling to pin down exactly how many people had gone missing.
The number initially believed to be on the boat increased because officials discovered that several onboard had not been listed as approved crew members or passengers, said Lt. Kerron Valere of the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard.
The small craft left Venezuela on Tuesday and overturned in the sea at some point not far from shore, Valere said in a statement.
The Venezuelan government did not immediately make public comments about the accident involving suspected migrants.
Valere said Venezuela was leading the search within that nation’s waters but the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard was assisting. He said the official manifest listed 25 people on the boat, but authorities had determined that at least 34 were on the vessel.
Venezuelan opposition lawmaker Robert Alcalá said that 25 boarded in the Venezuelan port of Güiria but others illegally got on at another stop along the coast. He said fishermen had rescued several people after the sinking.
Dozens of relatives of the missing were in Güiria anxiously waiting for word back from the search vessels, he said.
Alcalá told The Associated Press that Venezuela’s economic crunch of hyperinflation and food shortages drove the passengers — mostly women — onto the boat.
“They go to Trinidad because of the economic situation in this country,” he said.
In recent years, an estimated 3.7 million Venezuelans have fled the crisis-wracked country, where a political struggle is now playing out between US-backed opposition leader Juan Guaidó and socialist President Nicolás Maduro.
Most of Venezuela’s migrants travel by land into neighboring Colombia and Brazil, but others overload fishing boats to cross the sometimes deadly Caribbean waters to nearby islands.
Migrants often go to border cities and some Caribbean islands to work in the sex industry, allowing them to send money home to families back in Venezuela.
In January 2018, more than two dozen migrants were never found after a boat from Venezuela smashed onto rocks on the nearby Dutch island of Curacao. Officials said two people survived.
The missing boat overturned in strong waves near the island of Patos, a few miles off the Venezuelan coast. Some survivors were found drifting up to 34 miles (55 kilometers) from where the boat sank.
Seven security force vessels were searching for the missing, an official from the civil protection agency said. The official spoke to AP only on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly.
The online news website Daily Express quoted a Venezuelan living in Trinidad who said her sister could not be located. The 21-year-old was headed to the island to flee Venezuela because she said it lacked food and hospital care.