Erdogan threatens not to ratify Paris climate accord

German Chancellor Angela Merkel welcomes Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan at the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany July 7, 2017. (Reuters)
Updated 09 July 2017
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Erdogan threatens not to ratify Paris climate accord

HAMBURG: Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan threatened Saturday that his country would not ratify the Paris climate accord, speaking at the end of the G20 summit in Germany.
“After that step taken by America, the position that we adopt is in the direction of not passing it in parliament,” Erdogan said at a press conference in Hamburg.
The summit of the world’s biggest industrialized and developing economies agreed that 19 of its members would stick with the 2015 plan to fight global warming and “took note” of US President Donald Trump’s pullout from the initiative.
But shortly after the mega-summit ended, Erdogan, who met Trump at the event, told a news conference that Turkey was no longer a certain candidate and suggested other members of the “G19” also had doubts.
He said he had clearly told French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel: “No offense, but we will not pass it in our parliament as long as the promises made to us are not delivered.”
He said former French president Francois Hollande had promised him that Turkey would be classed as a developing and not an industrialized economy — meaning Ankara would receive money from a global climate fund rather than have to pay into it.
He also suggested some other, unidentified, countries had a “problem” with the agreement and said “they are not renewing their full support.”


Algeria tensions: Governing party chief backs protesters

Updated 20 March 2019
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Algeria tensions: Governing party chief backs protesters

  • Moab Bouchareb told a meeting of party leaders that the party “supports the popular movement”

ALGIERS: The acting head of Algeria’s governing party says it is throwing its support behind protests against President Abdelaziz Bouteflika
Critics viewed the move Wednesday as an effort to save the reputation of the FLN party, or National Liberation Front, amid increasing disillusionment with Algeria’s power structure.
FLN interim leader Moab Bouchareb told a meeting of party leaders that the party “supports the popular movement.” But he also appeared to support Bouteflika’s “roadmap” for political reforms.
Bouchareb himself has been criticized as representing a leadership considered corrupt and out of touch with Algeria’s struggling youth. The FLN is Bouteflika’s party.
On Wednesday, foreign affairs minister Ramtane Lamamra said the Algerian government is “ready for dialogue” with demonstrators.
“As I see it, the demonstrations have only grown more numerous, and there will be no solution except through dialogue,” he said in a press conference in Berlin.
“The Algerian government is ready for dialogue, and beyond that, they are prepared to welcome the representatives of the opposition and civil society in the new government which is currently being formed.”
Algerian Prime Minister Noureddine Bedoui has been struggling to form a new government as candidates sought to keep their distance from Bouteflika. Bedoui, who was appointed last week, had promised to create a new cabinet within days to respond to the demands of Algeria’s demonstrating youth.
Separately, the Protestant Church of Algeria issued a statement supporting the protests. The Church, whose exact number of members is not precisely known in the largely Muslim country, said it “fully shares the aspirations and legitimate claims of the Algerian people.”
Algeria’s union for imams and the Islamic High Council, a consultative body, had previously expressed their support for the protests.
Protesters want the ailing Bouteflika to step down after 20 years in power. Bouteflika responded by abandoning plans for a fifth term and promising reforms, but also delayed presidential elections indefinitely.
Demonstrators have demanded the government quit at the technical end of its mandate in April, along with the president who has rarely been seen since a 2013 stroke.