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Muslim worshippers, who refuse to enter due to new security measures including metal detectors and cameras, pray as Israeli border policemen stand outside the Lion's Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, on July 16, 2017, after security forces reopened the ultra-sensitive site. Israel took the highly unusual decision to close the Al-Aqsa mosque compound for Friday prayers, leading to anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. It remained closed on July 15, while parts of Jerusalem's Old City were also under lockdown. / AFP / Menahem KAHANA
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Muslim worshippers, who refuse to enter due to new security measures including metal detectors and cameras, pray as Israeli border policemen stand outside the Lion's Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, on July 16, 2017, after security forces reopened the ultra-sensitive site. Israel took the highly unusual decision to close the Al-Aqsa mosque compound for Friday prayers, leading to anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. It remained closed on July 15, while parts of Jerusalem's Old City were also under lockdown. / AFP / AHMAD GHARABLI
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Muslim worshippers, who refuse to enter due to new security measures including metal detectors and cameras, pray as Israeli border policemen stand outside the Lion's Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, on July 16, 2017, after security forces reopened the ultra-sensitive site. Israel took the highly unusual decision to close the Al-Aqsa mosque compound for Friday prayers, leading to anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. It remained closed on July 15, while parts of Jerusalem's Old City were also under lockdown. / AFP / Menahem KAHANA
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Israeli border policemen install metal detectors outside the Lion's Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, on July 16, 2017, after security forces reopened the ultra-sensitive site, whose closure after a deadly attack earlier in the week sparked anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. Three Arab Israeli assailants opened fire on Israeli police on July 14 in the Old City, killing two of them before fleeing to the nearby Haram al-Sharif compound, where they were shot dead by police. / AFP / MENAHEM KAHANA
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Muslim worshippers, who refuse to enter due to new security measures including metal detectors and cameras, pray as Israeli border policemen stand outside the Lion's Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, on July 16, 2017, after security forces reopened the ultra-sensitive site. Israel took the highly unusual decision to close the Al-Aqsa mosque compound for Friday prayers, leading to anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. It remained closed on July 15, while parts of Jerusalem's Old City were also under lockdown. / AFP / MENAHEM KAHANA
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Israeli border policemen install metal detectors outside the Lion's Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, on July 16, 2017, after security forces reopened the ultra-sensitive site, whose closure after a deadly attack earlier in the week sparked anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. Three Arab Israeli assailants opened fire on Israeli police on July 14 in the Old City, killing two of them before fleeing to the nearby Haram al-Sharif compound, where they were shot dead by police. / AFP / Menahem KAHANA
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A Palestinian man empties his bag as he walks through a recently installed metal detector outside the Lion's Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, on July 16, 2017, as security forces reopened the ultra-sensitive site, whose closure after a deadly attack earlier in the week sparked anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. Three Arab Israeli assailants opened fire on Israeli police on July 14 in the Old City, killing two of them before fleeing to the nearby Haram al-Sharif compound, where they were shot dead by police. / AFP / AHMAD GHARABLI
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A Palestinian man empties his pockets as he walks through a recently installed metal detector outside the Lion's Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, on July 16, 2017, as security forces reopened the ultra-sensitive site, whose closure after a deadly attack earlier in the week sparked anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. Three Arab Israeli assailants opened fire on Israeli police on July 14 in the Old City, killing two of them before fleeing to the nearby Haram al-Sharif compound, where they were shot dead by police. / AFP / AHMAD GHARABLI
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Muslim worshippers, who refuse to enter due to new security measures including metal detectors and cameras, pray as Israeli border policemen stand outside the Lion's Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, on July 16, 2017, after security forces reopened the ultra-sensitive site. Israel took the highly unusual decision to close the Al-Aqsa mosque compound for Friday prayers, leading to anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. It remained closed on July 15, while parts of Jerusalem's Old City were also under lockdown. / AFP / AHMAD GHARABLI
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Palestinian Muslim sheikhs, who refuse to enter due to new security measures including metal detectors and cameras, speak to the press outside the Lion's Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, on July 16, 2017, after security forces reopened the ultra-sensitive site. Israel took the highly unusual decision to close the Al-Aqsa mosque compound for Friday prayers, leading to anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. It remained closed on July 15, while parts of Jerusalem's Old City were also under lockdown. / AFP / AHMAD GHARABLI
Updated 16 July 2017

Al-Aqsa mosque compound under lockdown

Muslim worshippers, who refuse to enter due to new security measures including metal detectors and cameras, pray as Israeli border policemen stand outside the Lion's Gate, a main entrance to Al-Aqsa mosque compound, in Jerusalem's Old City, on July 16, 2017, after security forces reopened the ultra-sensitive site. Israel took the highly unusual decision to close the Al-Aqsa mosque compound for Friday prayers, leading to anger from Muslims and Jordan, the holy site's custodian. It remained closed on July 15, while parts of Jerusalem's Old City were also under lockdown. (AFP)