Video of Indian woman beaten ‘over dowry, giving birth to a girl’ goes viral

A video of a woman being beaten with hockey sticks in the Indian city of Patiala has gone viral. (Photo courtesy: ANI/Twitter)
Updated 17 July 2017
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Video of Indian woman beaten ‘over dowry, giving birth to a girl’ goes viral

DUBAI: A video of a woman being beaten with hockey sticks by members of her family in the Indian city of Patiala has gone viral.
According to local reports, the incident took place on July 14 and saw 35-year-old victim Meena Kashyap allegedly being beaten by her brother-in-law and his friends over a dowry demand and allegedly for giving birth to a girl.
Footage of the incident has gone viral on Indian social media, with police taking two men into custody shortly after the event.
“We had complained about the (dowry) issue last year itself but nothing was done. They have been married for the past two years now and have a girl child,” the victim’s father told news outlet ANI.
According to the Hindustan Times, the victim said she met with the Punjab director general of police last week regarding alleged police inaction over her family’s initial complaint about her dowry.
She alleged that her brother-in-law Kamaljeet Singh attacked her with hockey sticks after her husband’s family came to know about the complaint in which she accused them of harassing her family for payment of the dowry.


What We Are Reading Today: Taliban Narratives — The Use and Power of Stories in the Afghanistan Conflict

What We Are Reading Today: Taliban Narratives — The Use and Power of Stories in the Afghanistan Conflict
Updated 21 April 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Taliban Narratives — The Use and Power of Stories in the Afghanistan Conflict

Two months after the 9/11 attacks and little more than a month after the Oct. 7, 2001 American-led invasion of Afghanistan, the Taliban were forced from Kabul and appeared to have been crushed.

But the fundamentalist movement proved surprisingly resilient and is now openly active in 70 percent of the country, according to the results of a January BBC survey.

Meanwhile, the occupation of Afghanistan has become the longest war in US history.

“Taliban Narratives: The Use and Power of Stories in the Afghanistan Conflict” by Thomas H. Johnson explains how and why the Taliban’s clever use of propaganda has enabled the insurgency to flourish.

As well as running their own websites and magazines, the militants have used everything from simple graffiti to poetry and self-produced DVDs to publicize their cause. In doing so, they have proved highly adept at rallying large numbers of Afghans to their side and outwitting the far more sophisticated propaganda campaigns of the US and NATO.