London man denies claims he attacked Muslim woman, tweets he was defending girlfriend

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Was Pawel Uczciwek attacking a Muslim woman or defending his girlfriend? (Twitter)
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Aniso Abdulkadir (Twitter)
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Aniso Abdulkadir (Twitter)
Updated 17 July 2017
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London man denies claims he attacked Muslim woman, tweets he was defending girlfriend

DUBAI: A London-based architect accused of attacking a Muslim woman has taken to Twitter to defend his actions, claiming his friend was the victim and that he was defending her.

Aniso Abdulkadir posted tweets carrying a photo of Pawel Uczciwek, claiming he tried to pull off her hijab while she waited for a train at Baker Street underground station.

She said he shouted at her, telling her to “show her hair,” and spat in her friend’s face.

The alleged incident happened in the early hours of Saturday morning.

At the time Abdulkadir tweeted: “This man at Baker Street station forcefully attempted to pull my hijab off and when I instinctively grabbed ahold of my scarf he hit me.”



She added: “He proceeded to verbally abuse my friends and I, pinning one of them against the wall and spitting in her face.”

Her claims were retweeted more than 35,000 times by Monday afternoon.

British police confirmed the incident was being investigated as a hate crime. A police spokesman added: “Behavior like this is totally unacceptable and will not be tolerated… This incident has been reported to us and we’re investigating.”

But architect Pawel Uczciwek has now responded to the accusations, tweeting that the allegations made about him were “completely false.”

Defending his actions, he said his female friend was the victim of a racist attack and that he was trying to “diffuse” the situation.

London’s Metro newspaper quoted Uczciwek as saying: “The police is fully cooperating with me and will be able to obtain CCTV footage showing the three women attempting to attack my partner because we are in an interracial relationship.”

He added: “My partner was attacked by three people — i diffused it. The media does not even care that a black woman was attacked???

“Three people attempted to attack one person A BLACK WOMAN and there is not a care in the world from media???”

He tweeted that the perpetrators were treated as victims, adding: “I am shocked.”

Uczciwek wrote that he intervened to ensure none of the four women were harmed.

He added: “The media is using religion as a scapegoat because they clearly have no care for a black women being attacked in London.”















Google employees demand more oversight of China search engine plan

A Google sign is seen during the China Digital Entertainment Expo and Conference (ChinaJoy) in Shanghai, China August 3, 2018. (REUTERS)
Updated 17 August 2018
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Google employees demand more oversight of China search engine plan

  • Hundreds of employees have called on the company to provide more “transparency, oversight and accountability
  • Employees have asked Google to create an ethics review group with rank-and-file workers, appoint ombudspeople to provide independent review and internally publish assessments of projects

SAN FRANCISCO: Google is not close to launching a search engine app in China, its chief executive said at a companywide meeting on Thursday, according to a transcript seen by Reuters, as employees of the Alphabet Inc. unit called for more transparency and oversight of the project.
Chief Executive Sundar Pichai told staff that though development is in an early stage, providing more services in the world’s most populous country fits with Google’s global mission.
Hoping to gain approval from the Chinese government to provide a mobile search service, the company plans to block some websites and search terms, Reuters reported this month, citing unnamed sources.
Whether the company could or would launch search in China “is all very unclear,” Pichai said, according to the transcript. “The team has been in an exploration stage for quite a while now, and I think they are exploring many options.”
Disclosure of the secretive effort has disturbed some Google employees and human rights advocacy organizations. They are concerned that by agreeing to censorship demands, Google would validate China’s prohibitions on free expression and violate the “don’t be evil” clause in the company’s code of conduct.
Hundreds of employees have called on the company to provide more “transparency, oversight and accountability,” according to an internal petition seen by Reuters on Thursday.
After a separate petition this year, Google announced it would not renew a project to help the US military develop artificial intelligence technology for drones.
The China petition says employees are concerned the project, code named Dragonfly, “makes clear” that ethics principles Google issued during the drone debate “are not enough.”
“We urgently need more transparency, a seat at the table and a commitment to clear and open processes: Google employees need to know what we’re building,” states the document seen by Reuters.
The New York Times first reported the petition on Thursday. Google declined to comment.
Company executives have not commented publicly on Dragonfly, and their remarks at the company-wide meeting marked their first about the project since details about it were leaked.
Employees have asked Google to create an ethics review group with rank-and-file workers, appoint ombudspeople to provide independent review and internally publish assessments of projects that raise substantial ethical questions.
Pichai told employees: “We’ll definitely be transparent as we get closer to actually having a plan of record here” on Dragonfly, according to the transcript. He noted the company guards information on some projects where sharing too early can “cause issues.”
Three former employees involved with Google’s past efforts in China told Reuters current leadership may see offering limited search results in China as better than providing no information at all.
The same rationale led Google to enter China in 2006. It left in 2010 over an escalating dispute with regulators that was capped by what security researchers identified as state-sponsored cyberattacks against Google and other large US firms.
The former employees said they doubt the Chinese government will welcome back Google. A Chinese official, who declined to be named, told Reuters this month that it is “very unlikely” Dragonfly would be available this year.