British Muslim school faces govt takeover following student’s death

Al-Hijrah School in Birmingham
Updated 17 July 2017
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British Muslim school faces govt takeover following student’s death

DUBAI: A state-funded Muslim school in the UK faces a government takeover following the death of a student in March and a report claiming it was “inadequate.”
The recent report, published in June also stated that pupils were not “sufficiently” safe and staff were ill prepared for medical emergencies.
School inspectors visited the Al-Hijrah School following the death of Mohammed Ismaeel Ashraf, 9, in March. The boy collapsed at the school after apparently suffering an allergic reaction – he was taken to hospital, but died shortly after.
The school, which is based in the West Midland city of Birmingham, is also involved in an ongoing legal battle to segregate boys and girls.
Amanda Spielman, chief inspector for the education watchdog, the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (Ofsted), recently told British newspaper The Sunday Times: “I am deeply concerned about the idea that total segregation of children within a mixed school is acceptable.”
But the High Court ruled that Ofsted inspectors were wrong in their assumption that segregation would be bad for girls.
The judge said: “There is no evidence in this case that segregation particularly disadvantages women.”
Ofsted is appealing the decision.
The school has also previously been criticized following claims it was teaching students that it was okay for men to beat their wives.


Prince William visits Jordan’s Roman ruins at Jerash

Updated 25 June 2018
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Prince William visits Jordan’s Roman ruins at Jerash

  • Britain’s Prince William visited the Roman ruins of Jerash in northern Jordan

AMMAN: Britain’s Prince William visited the Roman ruins of Jerash in northern Jordan on Monday, accompanied by his host Crown Prince Hussein bin Abdullah as part of a historic Middle East tour.
The two princes met children from Jordan and neighboring war-torn Syria during their visit to the site, 50 kilometers (30 miles) north of Amman.
The visit to Jordan by the second in line to the British throne has been billed as a chance to bond with Hussein, a fellow graduate of Britain’s Royal Sandhurst Military Academy.
William was also due to meet British troops based in the kingdom, before heading across the River Jordan to Israel and the Palestinian territories.
The Duke of Cambridge and the heir to the Jordanian throne strolled along Jerash’s Colonnaded Street, a paved promenade lined with towering columns.
They also visited the Temple of Artemis, built on an elevated part of the site in honor of the goddess believed to protect the city, which was at its most prosperous in the third century.
When they reached the ancient site’s theater they were greeted by Syrian and Jordanian school children in traditional dress, who gave a performance including music and poetry.
The show was organized by the Makany Center, a UNESCO-backed program providing health and education to both Syrian and Jordanian pupils.
Some 650,000 Syrian refugees have registered with the United Nations in Jordan since fleeing their country’s seven-year war which was sparked by peaceful anti-government protests in 2011.
Amman estimates the actual number is closer to 1.3 million people and says it has spent more than $10 billion (8.5 billion euros) hosting them.
William paid tribute in a speech on Sunday to “the way in which you opened your doors to hundreds of thousands of refugees,” even as Jordan said the same day that it would be unable to host any new wave of asylum seekers.
His Middle East tour will see William become the first British royal to pay official visits to both Israel and the Palestinian territories.
William, who is president of the Football Association, was flying into Jordan as England thrashed Panama 6-1 in the World Cup on Sunday, but he caught a recording of the match on television at his host’s home.