Hamburg knife attacker was born in the UAE: German police

Police investigators work at the area around a supermarket in the northern German city of Hamburg, where a man killed one person and wounded several others in a knife attack, on Friday. (AFP / dpa / Markus Scholz)
Updated 29 July 2017
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Hamburg knife attacker was born in the UAE: German police

HAMBURG: The attacker who killed one person and injured four others in a Hamburg supermarket Friday is a 26-year-old man born in the United Arab Emirates, police said in a statement.
Police added that they have yet to determine the nationality of the perpetrator, who stabbed a 50-year-old man to death and wounded six others.
As a knife-wielding man sought to flee after killing one and injuring several at the supermarket, several passers-by gave chase and tackled him to the ground, said witnesses of the chaotic scenes Friday.
“People ran after the attacker and threw chairs at him,” 18-year-old Shaylin Roettmer told the national news agency DPA.
Police also confirmed that they were alerted to the attack by witnesses, who had given chase and overpowered the as-yet unidentified suspect.
Plainclothes officers were able to capture the man, who was lightly injured.
The man had struck on Friday afternoon at a popular supermarket on a busy high street in the northeast of Hamburg, Germany’s second city and host of early July’s G20 summit of world leaders.
He stormed into the supermarket with a “huge knife,” an unnamed woman told rolling news channel NTV, gesturing to show that the weapon was about 50 centimeters (20 inches) long.
“I thought I was in a horror movie, I thought he would kill me,” she said.
She said she feared she would die, as she was “queueing for the till and couldn’t get away.”
“As he was running out... he held up his arms and shouted ‘Allahu Akbar’,” she added.
On the run, the suspect struck a young girl on the street, another witness told NTV.
Hamburg resident Remo Pollio, meanwhile, told DPA that as the man was running away, “he held up the knife and shouted ‘Allahu Akbar’, he did that twice.”
Ralph Woyna corroborated Pollio’s account.
A police spokeswoman said she was unable to confirm the “Allahu Akbar” (“God is greatest” in Arabic) accounts.
Meanwhile, police helicopters were rattling overhead as officers blocked off the high street.
Officers armed with automatic rifles were also patrolling the streets.
“It was really shocking,” said Omar, who runs a newspaper stand.


India’s Parliament rejects no confidence motion against Modi

Updated 21 July 2018
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India’s Parliament rejects no confidence motion against Modi

  • After a marathon 12 hours of debate more than 60 percent of the lower house voted in the BJP’s favor
  • The opposition Congress party leader Rahul Gandhi crossed the chamber during debate to give an awkward embrace to a seated and clearly surprised Modi

NEW DELHI: India’s ruling party sailed through a confidence vote in a theatrical parliamentary session which saw a startled Prime Minister Narendra Modi embraced by his chief political foe.
Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) was in no danger of losing its first confidence motion since taking power four years ago, which was prompted by a minor party walking out of the governing coalition.
After a marathon 12 hours of debate, more than 60 percent of the lower house voted in the BJP’s favor, but the vote was overshadowed by the theatrics of bitter Modi rival Rahul Gandhi.
The opposition Congress party leader crossed the chamber during debate to give an awkward embrace to a seated and clearly surprised Modi.
“You can abuse me and call me names but I don’t have any hatred toward you,” Gandhi said to cheers from Congress lawmakers just before he hugged his rival.
After gathering his wits, Modi called Gandhi again to shake hands and pat his back, and the opposition leader winked mischieviously at Congress colleagues after returning to his seat.
Congress later voted against Modi’s government despite the brief bonhomie on the parliament floor.
The hug has since gone viral on social media and endlessly dissected non-stop on India’s cable TV channels and went viral on social media, with some praising Gandhi’s apparent gesture of goodwill.
“Earlier opposition parties... always managed to transcend rivalry at certain crucial moments,” said independent analyst Shiv Vishwanathan in comments to the Hindustan.
“Today, Rahul Gandhi captured that history.”
But Modi was less convinced of Gandhi’s sincerity, later telling parliament he was confused by Gandhi’s “childish” behavior.
Modi and Gandhi’s running war of words has escalated since polls showed a decline in the BJP’s popularity, fanning hopes of an opposition comeback in next year’s elections after a Congress rout in 2014.