Al Etihad Credit Bureau starts issuing commercial credit scores to UAE businesses

The three digit scores — ranging from 300 to 900 — determine the creditworthiness and risks of default of a company. (Reuters)
Updated 02 August 2017
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Al Etihad Credit Bureau starts issuing commercial credit scores to UAE businesses

DUBAI: Al Etihad Credit Bureau on Wednesday said it has began issuing commercial credit scores to businesses in the UAE.
The three digit scores — ranging from 300 to 900 — determine the creditworthiness and risks of default of a company. It is calculated using information from various sources, like banks, finance companies and telecom companies. The higher the score, the lower the risk of default.
“The launch of the Commercial Credit Score will help banks and other commercial lenders to assess the risk from the time of application throughout the entire lending relationship,” Marwan Ahmad Lutfi, chief executive of Al Etihad Credit Bureau said in a statement.
Companies can obtain their credit scores by visiting the bureau’s customer service centers in Abu Dhabi and Dubai, and presenting documents such as the original Emirates ID of company’s owner or the company’s authorized signatory, original trade license, the original articles of association of the company and a valid e-mail address.
A standard commercial report — with no score — costs Dh180, while a report with a score costs Dh220. A credit report for an individual or establishment without a score costs Dh100 while it costs an additional Dh50 to get one with a score. A credit score only, with no report, costs Dh60.
According to international best practices, a good commercial credit score assists small and medium enterprises in accessing the credit market because the analytic and predictive score indicates the likelihood of future default and the effectiveness of current management, the bureau said.


Shareholders of India’s Jet Airways approve debt-for-equity swap

Updated 23 February 2019
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Shareholders of India’s Jet Airways approve debt-for-equity swap

  • The plan will mean the lenders will have a bigger holding than any other shareholder
  • Currently, Chairman Naresh Goyal owns a 51 percent stake in the company and Abu Dhabi’s Etihad Airways owns 24 percent

MUMBAI: India’s Jet Airways said late on Friday that its shareholders approved a plan to convert existing debt to equity, paving the way for the troubled company’s lenders to infuse funds and nominate directors to its board.
Jet’s board last week approved a plan by lenders, led by State Bank of India, for an equity infusion, debt restructuring and the sale or sale-and-lease-back of aircraft.
The plan will mean the lenders will have a bigger holding than any other shareholder.
Currently, Chairman Naresh Goyal owns a 51 percent stake in the company and Abu Dhabi’s Etihad Airways owns 24 percent.
Jet, which had net debt of 72.99 billion rupees ($1.03 billion) as of end-December, has debt payments looming next month, according to rating agency ICRA. It has been unable to pay pilots’ salaries and has outstanding bills to aircraft lessors.
The company, India’s biggest full-service carrier, is struggling with competition from budget rivals, high oil prices and a weaker rupee. The share price took a beating in 2018, losing nearly 70 percent of its value.
In a regulatory filing, Jet said on Friday that 98 percent of its shareholders voted to increase the share capital to 22 billion rupees ($309.8 million) from 2 billion rupees at a special meeting.
Jet, whose financial woes are set against the backdrop of wider aviation industry problems, has been in the red for four straight quarters.