Al Etihad Credit Bureau starts issuing commercial credit scores to UAE businesses

The three digit scores — ranging from 300 to 900 — determine the creditworthiness and risks of default of a company. (Reuters)
Updated 02 August 2017
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Al Etihad Credit Bureau starts issuing commercial credit scores to UAE businesses

DUBAI: Al Etihad Credit Bureau on Wednesday said it has began issuing commercial credit scores to businesses in the UAE.
The three digit scores — ranging from 300 to 900 — determine the creditworthiness and risks of default of a company. It is calculated using information from various sources, like banks, finance companies and telecom companies. The higher the score, the lower the risk of default.
“The launch of the Commercial Credit Score will help banks and other commercial lenders to assess the risk from the time of application throughout the entire lending relationship,” Marwan Ahmad Lutfi, chief executive of Al Etihad Credit Bureau said in a statement.
Companies can obtain their credit scores by visiting the bureau’s customer service centers in Abu Dhabi and Dubai, and presenting documents such as the original Emirates ID of company’s owner or the company’s authorized signatory, original trade license, the original articles of association of the company and a valid e-mail address.
A standard commercial report — with no score — costs Dh180, while a report with a score costs Dh220. A credit report for an individual or establishment without a score costs Dh100 while it costs an additional Dh50 to get one with a score. A credit score only, with no report, costs Dh60.
According to international best practices, a good commercial credit score assists small and medium enterprises in accessing the credit market because the analytic and predictive score indicates the likelihood of future default and the effectiveness of current management, the bureau said.


Lufthansa announces overhaul of budget carrier Eurowings

Updated 24 June 2019
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Lufthansa announces overhaul of budget carrier Eurowings

  • Lufthansa cited falling revenues at Eurowings as a major reason for its warning on full-year profits on June 16
  • Eurowings’ long-haul business would be managed by Lufthansa in the future

BERLIN: Lufthansa on Monday announced a turnaround plan for Eurowings in which the budget carrier will focus on short-haul flights and seek a 15 percent cut in costs by 2022 in the hope of returning to profit.
The German airline cited falling revenues at Eurowings as a major reason for its warning on full-year profits on June 16. Eurowings’ revenue was also forecast to fall sharply in the second quarter.
Lufthansa said its Eurowings fleet would be standardized on the Airbus A320 family and it would seek to boost productivity at Eurowings by limiting itself in Germany to one air operator’s certificate.
Brussels Airlines — the Belgian national flag carrier which Lufthansa took control of in 2016 — would not be integrated into Eurowings, Lufthansa said. A turnaround plan for Brussels Airlines will be announced in the third quarter.
Lufthansa also said it would start pegging its dividend payout ratio to net profit in the future to give the group more flexibility. It would pay out a regular dividend of 20 percent-40 percent of net profit, adjusted for one-off gains and losses.
Lufthansa said Eurowings’ long-haul business would be managed by Lufthansa in the future.
Carsten Spohr, Chief Executive Officer of Lufthansa, said Monday’s announcements sent “a clear signal that this company cares about its shareholders and tries to create value for them.”
Lufthansa said its Network Airlines — made up of Lufthansa, Swiss and Austrian Airlines — would aim to use innovations in sales and distribution to make a contribution to increasing unit revenues by 3 percent by 2022.
Network Airlines will aim to reduce unit costs continuously by 1 to 2 percent annually, the airline said.