HBO offers $250,000 as ‘bounty payment’ to Game of Thrones hackers

The hackers have posted some HBO files online, including an episode of the popular series Game of Thrones. (Courtesy HBO)
Updated 11 August 2017
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HBO offers $250,000 as ‘bounty payment’ to Game of Thrones hackers

BENGALURU: The hackers behind HBO’s recent data breach have leaked an e-mail in which the US cable channel offered them $250,000 as a “bounty payment,” Hollywood trade paper Variety reported on Thursday.
The message from HBO, the Time Warner cable unit that broadcasts “Game of Thrones,” offers the money as part of a program in which “white-hat professionals” are rewarded for identifying cybersecurity flaws, the Variety report said.
The e-mail was worded in a way that would allow HBO to stall for time while it assessed the situation, Variety reported, citing a source close to HBO’s investigation.
HBO also requested the hackers to extend a ransom payment deadline by one week, Variety said.
The Guardian and other publications reported earlier this week that hackers had posted some stolen HBO files online, demanding a bitcoin ransom to prevent additional releases.
HBO did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
The hack has come at a sensitive time for HBO, whose parent Time Warner is awaiting regulatory approval to sell itself to AT&T in an $85.4 billion deal announced in October.


Netflix subscriber slip hints at ‘lumpy’ road ahead for streaming giant

Updated 14 min 51 sec ago
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Netflix subscriber slip hints at ‘lumpy’ road ahead for streaming giant

  • Shares of Netflix fell 13 percent on Tuesday after it reported a surprise shortfall in subscriber additions
  • While Wall Street remains overwhelmingly positive on Netflix and its role in video streaming globally, the numbers did raise question marks over future growth

CALIFORNIA: Shares of Netflix fell 13 percent on Tuesday after it reported a surprise shortfall in subscriber additions for a second quarter marked by the lack of a blockbuster new show and the FIFA World Cup.
While Wall Street remains overwhelmingly positive on Netflix and its role in video streaming globally, the numbers did raise question marks over future growth and six brokerages cut their price targets on the company’s shares.
“The quarter is a reminder that Netflix’s cadence of net adds is not linear, but lumpy in nature,” said Justin Patterson, an analyst with Raymond James and Associates in San Francisco, while pointing to the absence of a new hit series as a driver.
“The company had lots of new content during the quarter; what it did not have was a major new breakout series.”
Riding on the success of its original shows such as “13 Reasons Why,” “House of Cards” and “Orange is the New Black,” Netflix had beaten subscriber growth expectations in seven out of last 10 quarters.
That has driven a doubling of its share price in the last year, raising its value to within sight of $200 billion as of Monday’s close.
What is not clear is where the hurdles to that unbroken run of growth will come from, be it stronger competition from Amazon Prime or the changes in control of major film and TV franchises heralded by Walt Disney Co. and Comcast Corp’s bid for Twenty-First Century Fox Inc. .
Netflix added 5.15 million customers from April through June, 1 million fewer than forecasts from Thomson Reuters I/B/E/S and down from 7.41 million in the first quarter.
“While subscriber weakness is obviously an issue, the company’s inability to explain it satisfactorily could weigh on the stock over the coming quarter,” Barclays analysts said.
Still, there was only one outright cut in a trading recommendation on the stock — by Deutsche Bank to hold from buy — and two others actually upped their recommendations. At least three raised their price targets.
“Netflix has faced hurdles before and this Q2 report won’t be the last,” PiperJaffray analyst Michael Olson wrote.
“The long term potential is too great for us to suggest anything other than buying (the shares),” he added, listing a just 15 percent share of Internet households outside China as a huge potential market.
Olson and several others pointed to the World Cup as a possible distraction in the quarter that might have encouraged subscribers to hold off or freeze subscriptions for a month.
The 2018 soccer tournament that is among the most-watched TV events started on June 14 and has just finished.
“Netflix is in a business that varies by quarter anyway and perhaps the company shouldn’t have gotten too enamored with the crazy success of the last two quarters which was invigorating but not sustainable,” Forrester analyst James McQuivey said.