Non-oil trade at Dubai’s Jebel Ali Free Zone hits $80.2 billion in 2016

China kept its position as the free zone’s major player with $11.3 billion worth of non-oil goods, equipment and commodities being shipped in via the Jebel Ali port. (AP)
Updated 13 August 2017
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Non-oil trade at Dubai’s Jebel Ali Free Zone hits $80.2 billion in 2016

DUBAI: Non-oil trade at Jebel Ali Free Zone rose 17 percent to $80.2 billion (SR300.75 billion) or an equivalent 27.9 million tons in 2016, from 23.9 million tons a year earlier.
China kept its position as the free zone’s major player with $11.3 billion worth of non-oil goods, equipment and commodities being shipped in via the Jebel Ali port; followed by Saudi Arabia with $7 billion; Vietnam with $4.3 billion and the US with $3.7 billion.
Machinery, electronics and electrical goods accounted for almost half of the total trade at Dubai’s main trade and logistics hub, while petrochemicals and the oil and gas sector had 16 percent; followed by food and fast-moving consumer goods at 8 percent; textiles and garments at 7 percent and automotive and spare parts at 6 percent.
“The value and volume of trade through Jafza underlines the strength of the national economy and its ability to adapt to global trading conditions, create investment opportunities and open up new markets to exports from the UAE,” Sultan Ahmed bin Sulayem, the group chairman and chief executive of DP World, said in a statement.
Trade with the Asia Pacific region in 2016 reached $32.4 billion; with the Middle East at $27.2 billion; the European continent at $9.9 billion; the Americas at $5.5 billion and Africa at $5 billion.
“Jebel Ali Port plays a pivotal role in enabling international trade so companies operating in Jafza can import and re-export their goods and products to the various countries of the region,” bin Sulayem said, noting Dubai’s logistics corridor, which connects the port with Al Maktoum International Airport in a single customs zone, helps reduce the sea-to-air time constraint in the movement of goods.
“Reducing the time taken for the movement of goods between sea and air transport modes and making the area the main transit gateway in the Middle East,” he said.


Erdogan hints Turkey may ban some Israeli goods because of Gaza violence

Updated 22 May 2018
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Erdogan hints Turkey may ban some Israeli goods because of Gaza violence

  • Erdogan is campaigning for re-election in June
  • Comments follow deaths in Gaza

President Tayyip Erdogan has hinted that Turkey might consider imposing a ban on imports of some Israeli goods over the killing of Palestinian protesters by Israeli forces on the Gaza border, media reported on Tuesday.

Erdogan, who is campaigning for re-election in June, last week hosted Muslim leaders who condemned the events in Gaza and the opening of the United States embassy in Jerusalem.

Speaking to reporters on a return flight from Bosnia on Sunday, Erdogan said the 57-member Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) had recommended that a boycott be imposed on Israeli goods.

“I hope that OIC member countries implement a boycott decision in line with the recommendation. Consequently, no product should be brought from there any more. Naturally we will assess this situation in the same way,” Hurriyet newspaper reported Erdogan as saying.

A declaration by the OIC on Friday repeated a call for countries to ban “products of the illegal Israeli settlements from entering their markets,” referring to goods produced in the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Golan Heights.

It did not seek a ban on all Israeli goods.

The declaration also called for “economic restrictions (on) countries, officials, parliaments, companies or individuals” who followed the United States and moved their embassies to Jerusalem.

US President Donald Trump’s move to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and shift the US embassy there reversed decades of US policy, upsetting the Arab world and Western allies.

Erdogan said last week that Trump’s move had emboldened Israel to put down the protests at the border with Gaza with excessive force, likening the actions of Israeli forces to Nazi Germany’s treatment of Jews in World War Two, when millions were killed in concentration camps.

The violence in Gaza, where more than 60 Palestinians were killed on May 14 led to Turkey and Israel expelling each other’s senior diplomats. Erdogan also traded barbs on Twitter with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Israel was the 10th-largest market for Turkish exports in 2017, buying some $3.4 billion of goods, according to IMF statistics.

Data from Turkey’s statistics institute showed that trade volume between the two was at $4.9 billion in 2017. Turkey, which has a trade surplus with Israel, imports plastics and mineral oils among other goods from there.

Erdogan said Turkey would reconsider its ties with Israel.

“We will put our relations on the table, in particular our economic and trade relations. We have an election ahead of us. After the election we will take our steps in this direction,” Erdogan was quoted as saying.