Non-oil trade at Dubai’s Jebel Ali Free Zone hits $80.2 billion in 2016

China kept its position as the free zone’s major player with $11.3 billion worth of non-oil goods, equipment and commodities being shipped in via the Jebel Ali port. (AP)
Updated 13 August 2017
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Non-oil trade at Dubai’s Jebel Ali Free Zone hits $80.2 billion in 2016

DUBAI: Non-oil trade at Jebel Ali Free Zone rose 17 percent to $80.2 billion (SR300.75 billion) or an equivalent 27.9 million tons in 2016, from 23.9 million tons a year earlier.
China kept its position as the free zone’s major player with $11.3 billion worth of non-oil goods, equipment and commodities being shipped in via the Jebel Ali port; followed by Saudi Arabia with $7 billion; Vietnam with $4.3 billion and the US with $3.7 billion.
Machinery, electronics and electrical goods accounted for almost half of the total trade at Dubai’s main trade and logistics hub, while petrochemicals and the oil and gas sector had 16 percent; followed by food and fast-moving consumer goods at 8 percent; textiles and garments at 7 percent and automotive and spare parts at 6 percent.
“The value and volume of trade through Jafza underlines the strength of the national economy and its ability to adapt to global trading conditions, create investment opportunities and open up new markets to exports from the UAE,” Sultan Ahmed bin Sulayem, the group chairman and chief executive of DP World, said in a statement.
Trade with the Asia Pacific region in 2016 reached $32.4 billion; with the Middle East at $27.2 billion; the European continent at $9.9 billion; the Americas at $5.5 billion and Africa at $5 billion.
“Jebel Ali Port plays a pivotal role in enabling international trade so companies operating in Jafza can import and re-export their goods and products to the various countries of the region,” bin Sulayem said, noting Dubai’s logistics corridor, which connects the port with Al Maktoum International Airport in a single customs zone, helps reduce the sea-to-air time constraint in the movement of goods.
“Reducing the time taken for the movement of goods between sea and air transport modes and making the area the main transit gateway in the Middle East,” he said.


Oil drops as Iran signals support for OPEC production rise

Updated 21 June 2018
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Oil drops as Iran signals support for OPEC production rise

  • Prices were prevented from dropping further by robust US fuel demand seen in record refinery runs, strong travel data and a large decline in crude inventories
  • Beyond the short-term, Barclays said there were headwinds for oil prices

SINGAPORE: Oil prices fell on Thursday as Iran signaled it could be won over to a small rise in OPEC crude output, potentially paving the way for the producer cartel to agree a supply increase during a meeting on Friday.
However, prices were prevented from dropping further by robust US fuel demand seen in record refinery runs, strong travel data and a large decline in crude inventories.
Brent crude futures were at $74.33 per barrel at 0426 GMT, down 41 cents, or 0.55 percent, from their last close.
US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $65.50 a barrel, down 21 cents, or 0.3 percent.
Iran, a major supplier within the producer cartel of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), signaled on Wednesday it could agree on a small increase in the group’s output during a meeting to be held at OPEC’s headquarters in Vienna on June 22 together with non-OPEC member but top producer Russia.
“There appears to be an air of confidence that this deal will move through,” said Stephen Innes, head of trading for Asia-Pacific at futures brokerage OANDA in Singapore.
“We expect OPEC and Russia to gradually add supplies back to the market by next year, mostly offsetting the almost 1 million barrels per day (bpd) supply disruption in Venezuela,” Barclays bank said.
Tehran had previously resisted pressure by OPEC’s de-facto leader Saudi Arabia to raise output.
Even with Iran appearing to fall in line, analysts do not expect a harmonious OPEC meeting.
“Our expectations are for a tense, discordant and highly geopolitical OPEC+ meeting,” said Japan’s Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group in a note to clients.
OPEC, together with other key producers including Russia, started withholding output in 2017 to prop up prices, but a tightening market in 2018 led to calls by major consumers for more supplies.
In a sign of strong demand, US refineries processed a seasonal record of 17.7 million bpd of crude oil last week, according to data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) said on Wednesday.
This comes as a record 46.9 million Americans are expected to travel during the upcoming July 4 holiday, according to the American Automobile Association on Thursday, which is seen as a leading indicator for US fuel demand.
Amid healthy consumption, commercial US crude inventories dropped by 5.9 million barrels in the week to June 15, to 426.53 million barrels, the EIA said.
US crude oil production was flat week-on-week, remaining at a record 10.9 million bpd.
Beyond the short-term, Barclays said there were headwinds for oil prices.
“Deleveraging in China and a weakening in the narrative around synchronous global economic growth are likely to add headwinds for all commodities,” it said.