Stunt driver dies while filming ‘Deadpool 2’ in Vancouver

Police tape surrounds the scene as ramps for a motorcycle stunt are seen on the steps outside the Vancouver Convention Centre while police officers investigate after a female stunt driver died after a crash on set, in Vancouver, B.C., on Monday Aug. 14, 2017. (AP)
Updated 15 August 2017
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Stunt driver dies while filming ‘Deadpool 2’ in Vancouver

VANCOUVER: “Deadpool 2” star Ryan Reynolds is mourning the death of a motorcycle stunt driver killed during production Monday.
Reynolds released a statement on Twitter a few hours after the accident near the waterfront in downtown Vancouver.
“Today, we tragically lost a member of our crew while filming Deadpool,” the actor wrote. “We’re heartbroken, shocked and devastated ... but recognize nothing can compare to the grief and inexplicable pain her family and loved ones must feel in this moment.”
Reynolds, a native of Vancouver playing the Marvel Comics superhero Deadpool in the 20th Century Fox movie, said his heart “pours out to them — along with each and every person she touched in this world.”
The motorcycle crash happened near the Shaw Tower office building, where a crumpled motorcycle was seen lying on its side and a window was smashed.
Nathan Kramchynski, who works on the seventh floor of the building, said he watched rehearsals for the stunt outside the Vancouver Convention Center. The stunt woman had been riding the motorcycle down a set of stairs from the center and stopped when she reached the street, he said.
But when the accident happened, the driver appeared to pick up speed, crossed the street and swerved to avoid pedestrians before disappearing from his view, Kramchynski said.
“She lost control really quickly. It happened in a split second,” he said. “She was going full throttle and then there’s a building there.”
Another witness, Sharmina Kermalli, said she had just walked into a Starbucks next door to where the accident happened when she heard a loud crash. She ran outside and saw glass still falling on the body of the motorcycle driver.
The name of the stunt woman was not immediately released.
Police said WorkSafeBC, the British Columbia provincial workplace safety agency, and the coroner’s service were investigating. Trish Knight Chernecki of WorkSafe BC said some investigators are looking at any possible occupational health and safety issues while others examine the cause of the crash and prevention in the future.
The last stunt death in British Columbia was in 1996, when a person jumped from a helicopter and a parachute failed to open, she said.
In March 2016, actor Dylan O’Brien suffered injuries on the British Columbia set of the latest instalment of the “Maze Runner” film series. WorkSafe BC said Fox Productions Inc. didn’t rehearse a stunt sequence properly, but Fox said the stunt was thoroughly rehearsed.
A stuntman was fatally injured last month in Georgia during production of “The Walking Dead.” He fell head-first onto concrete about seven meters below after appearing to try to grab a railing to stop his fall.


Pint-sized heroes score big in Marvel’s latest flick

This image released by Marvel Studios shows a scene from "Ant-Man and the Wasp." (Disney/Marvel Studios via AP)
Updated 16 July 2018
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Pint-sized heroes score big in Marvel’s latest flick

  • Characters who fly off the pages of comic books and onto the silver screen are often exciting and Ant-Man and the Wasp are no different
  • What is really memorable about this film is the emotional high

CHENNAI: Characters who fly off the pages of comic books and onto the silver screen are often dynamic and exciting, and Ant-Man and the Wasp are no different. The characters of Scott Lang and Hope van Dyne (Ant-Man and the Wasp, respectively) go on an epic adventure in the 20th release in Disney’s Marvel Cinematic Universe series of comic book movies, and the first to feature a woman in the title.

Directed by Peyton Reed, Ant-Man (Paul Rudd) and the Wasp (Evangeline Lilly) star in a gleeful movie that, for two hours, takes viewers into the realm of sheer fantastical fantasy. There is a lot of fun here and the special effects dexterously push the pulse-pounding plot as buildings shrink into miniature form and vehicles go from minuscule to massive in the blink of an eye.

It’s the second movie in the series and this time, Scott Lang languishes under house arrest in San Francisco after being caught as his shrinkable superhero alter-ego fighting some of the other Avengers in “Civil War.” He dotes on his young daughter Cassie (Abby Ruder Forston) and the pair make the most of their time together at home, but his world is turned upside down when he’s confronted by Hope Van Dyne and her father, the brilliant quantum physicist Hank Pym (Michael Douglas), with an urgent new mission.

His wife, Janet van Dyne (Michelle Pfeiffer), has been stuck in the quantum realm for 30 years and it’s time to save her from being lost forever.

What is really memorable about this film is the emotional high — the tender relationship between Lang and his daughter, the stirrings of love between him and Hope and Hank’s unwavering feelings for his long-missing wife. These play out as strongly as the electrifying car chases, the fantastic fights and the terrific transmogrification of just about everything.
Besides the gigantic helping of humor — most of which comes courtesy of a hilarious Michael Peña — the film is made by a wistful Pfeiffer, a grumbling Douglas and a hilarious Rudd, who all add that touch of magic humanism.