Four arrested in India for leaking ‘Game of Thrones’ episode

This image released by HBO shows a scene from an episode of ‘Game of Thrones,’ which aired Sunday, Aug. 6, 2017. The series continued its ratings reign with a best-yet audience of 10.2 million. (HBO via AP)
Updated 15 August 2017
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Four arrested in India for leaking ‘Game of Thrones’ episode

MUMBAI: Four people have been arrested in India for leaking an episode from HBO’s “Game of Thrones” television series before it was aired in the country, police said Monday.
Already the most pirated show in TV history, the popular fantasy drama — which tells the story of noble families vying for the Iron Throne — has been plagued by leaks in recent weeks following the premiere of the seventh season.
After receiving a complaint for a company “we investigated the case and have arrested four individuals for unauthorized publication of the fourth episode from season seven,” Deputy Commissioner of Police Akbar Pathan told AFP.
He said the four — accused of criminal breach of trust and computer-related offenses — would be detained until August 21 amid an investigation.
The case was filed by a Mumbai-based company responsible for storing and processing the TV episodes for an app, local media said.
The four arrested were company employees who possessed official credentials giving them access to the episodes, the reports added.
Game of Thrones has more Emmy Awards than any narrative show in history and airs in 170 countries, with viewership figures shattering records across the world.
As well as being a hit globally, it has a massive fan base in South Asia.
Showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss last year announced the shortened run of seven and six episodes for the final two seasons and confirmed the summer return for season seven, a departure from the usual April premieres.
The show has been teasing winter’s arrival since its pilot episode in 2011, and in the latest episode preview “Death Is The Enemy” has finally moved closer to showcasing a battle between a horde of undead “White Walkers” from the frozen North and a troop of warriors led by hero Jon Snow (Kit Harington).


Expert tests prove Arabsat not involved in illegal broadcasts of World Cup

Updated 16 July 2018
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Expert tests prove Arabsat not involved in illegal broadcasts of World Cup

  • Multiple tests by experts confirm Arabsat frequencies were not used for illegal World Cup broadcasts
  • Arabsat’s CEO demands immediate retraction and apology from FIFA after research vindicates broadcaster

RIYADH: The Arab Satellite Communications Organization (Arabsat) this week told FIFA that an investigation performed by seven independent satellite communications experts has confirmed its satellite frequencies were not, and have not been used by an entity operating as “beoutQ” for illegal broadcasts of 2018 FIFA World Cup matches. 
The detailed letter to FIFA sent on Arabsat’s behalf summarized the evidence, which conclusively showed the falsity of FIFA’s claim that Arabsat had been “distributing” beoutQ’s pirate broadcasts.  “Arabsat has always been confident that our satellite network has not been used by beoutQ,” said Khalid Balkheyour, Arabsat’s CEO.  “Nevertheless, we undertook a very costly investigation to eliminate any doubts and to provide evidence to share with FIFA and the world.” 
Arabsat’s letter to FIFA detailed specific tests showing why FIFA’s claims that beoutQ was operating on specific Arabsat frequencies at specific times were wholly wrong.  The statement explained that, FIFA had claimed beoutQ was operating on Arabsat frequency 12341 MHz for several World Cup matches.  But tests conducted by several independent satellite communications experts showed that that frequency carried no video content at all at the very dates and times asserted by FIFA.   
Likewise, FIFA asserted that beoutQ broadcast different matches on Arabsat frequency 11996 MHz.  Again, Arabsat’s technical experts demonstrated that FIFA was wrong.  Arabsat’s experts showed that blocking the frequency had no effect on beoutQ’s pirate World Cup broadcasts, and that only legitimate broadcasts (including BBC, Sky News and CNBC) were available on that frequency – not beoutQ. 
Arabsat’s tests also showed that other satellite carriers might be carrying beoutQ’s pirate broadcasts.  “We received one set of test results in which our expert blocked all Arabsat frequencies,” Balkheyour said, “but beoutQ’s World Cup broadcasts continued.”  This strongly suggests that beoutQ used a different, non-Arabsat satellite to broadcast the offending content. 
“Arabsat is entirely vindicated in its decision to undertake its comprehensive investigation before taking the drastic step of shutting down satellite transponders – as FIFA had demanded,” added Balkheyour.   
The statement added that the experts’ findings had deepened Arabsat’s conviction that beIN Sports, a subsidiary of Al Jazeera, was behind allegations that Arabsat satellites had been used by beoutQ.  Arabsat believes that beIN Sports contrived the allegations as part of a smear campaign to deflect attention away from its technological inability to prevent beoutQ’s piracy.
Arabsat has demanded that FIFA immediately issue a public retraction of and apology for its claims that Arabsat was somehow complicit or did not do enough to stop beoutQ.  “Arabsat has been deeply offended and harmed by beIN’s and FIFA’s attacks,” Balkheyour said.  “Now that FIFA has been proven wrong, it should apologize for making such offensive statements.”