BBC Persian staff see assets frozen by Iranian authorities

Authorities in Tehran have frozen the assets of staff working for, or contributing to BBC Persian (Shutterstock)
Updated 15 August 2017
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BBC Persian staff see assets frozen by Iranian authorities

DUBAI: The BBC say’s the Iranian authorities have frozen the assets of its staff working for the Persian service the corporation has reported on its website.
Now BBC World Service Director Francesca Unsworth has slammed what she said was an apparent “targeted attack on BBC Persian staff, former staff and some contributors.”
And the corporation has called on the Iranian authorities to reverse the order that freezes the assets of staff in the country, preventing them from buying or selling property, cars and other goods.
BBC Persian, which is banned in Iran, has previously reported that its staff and family members have been routinely harassed and intimidated by the authorities.
The service says it has obtained a court order listing the names of 152 current and former staff, as well as contributors whose non-liquid assets have been frozen by the Shahid Moghadas Courthouse, based in Tehran’s Evin prison.
The BBC says it received no notification of the order, but instead discovered the asset freeze when the relative of an employee tried selling property on their behalf.
“We deplore what appears to be a targeted attack on BBC Persian staff, former staff, and some contributors… It is appalling that anyone should suffer legal or financial consequences because of their association with the BBC,” Unsworth was quoted as saying in a statement.
Meanwhile management at BBC Persian said the order was “another attempt by Iran’s judiciary to silence impartial journalists.”
And acting head of BBC Persian, Amir Azimi, vowed to continue providing a service with staff continuing in their work.


Facebook cracks down on bogus posts inciting violence

Updated 19 July 2018
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Facebook cracks down on bogus posts inciting violence

  • Facebook may remove inaccurate or misleading context, such as doctored photos
  • Hate speech and threats deemed credible are violations of Facebook rules, and are removed

MENLO PARK, United States: Facebook on Wednesday built on its campaign to prevent the platform from being used to spread dangerous misinformation, saying it will remove bogus posts likely to spark violence.
The new tactic being spread through the global social network was tested in Sri Lanka, which was recently rocked by inter-religious over false information posted on the world’s leading online social network.
“There are certain forms of misinformation that have contributed to physical harm, and we are making a policy change which will enable us to take that type of content down,” a Facebook spokesman said after a briefing on the policy at the company’s campus in Silicon Valley.
“We will be begin implementing the policy during the coming months.”
For example, Facebook may remove inaccurate or misleading context, such as doctored photos, created or shared to stir up to ignite volatile situations in the real world.
The social network said it is partnering with local organizations and authorities adept at identifying when posts are false and likely to prompt violence.
Misinformation removed in Sri Lanka under the new policy included content falsely contending that Muslims were poisoning food given or sold to Buddhists, according to Facebook.
Hate speech and threats deemed credible are violations of Facebook rules, and are removed.
The new policy takes another step back, eliminating content that may not be explicitly violent but which seems likely to encourage such behavior.
Facebook has been lambasted for allowing rumors or blatantly false information to circulate that may have contributed to violence.
Many see Facebook as being used as a vehicle for spreading false information in recent years.
Facebook has implemented a series of changes aimed at fighting use of the social network to spread misinformation, from fabrications that incite violence to untruths that sway elections.