Man United hits four again, Mane lifts Liverpool

Manchester United’s Romelu Lukaku scores their second goal against Swansea City. (Reuters)
Updated 19 August 2017
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Man United hits four again, Mane lifts Liverpool

LONDON: Romelu Lukaku was on target again as Manchester United continued their fine early-season form with a second successive 4-0 win on Saturday, this time at Swansea City.
Eric Bailly, Paul Pogba and substitute Anthony Martial also found the net at the Liberty Stadium, giving Jose Mourinho’s side their second big win after last weekend’s 4-0 victory over West Ham United.
Sadio Mane struck in the 73rd minute to give Liverpool a 1-0 home win over Crystal Palace and get Jurgen Klopp’s side up and running after their 3-3 draw at Watford.
“The team was confident from the first minute,” said Mourinho after a result that means United have scored four goals in their first two league games for the first time in 110 years.
“I like to see the confidence that the players are having in this moment. There’s no panic. The team was always confident and always trying to move the ball. I’m really happy.”
Having had to work hard to break Swansea down, United went in front just before half-time when Bailly stabbed in his first goal for the club after Lukasz Fabianski had pushed Pogba’s header against the bar.
Attacking changes left Swansea vulnerable at the back in the latter stages and United took full advantage to score three goals in the space of just four minutes.
Henrikh Mkhitaryan teed up Lukaku for his fourth goal in three United games in the 80th minute and then freed Pogba to beat Fabianski with a delightful dinked finish before Martial tucked in a fourth.
At Anfield, Liverpool manager Klopp made five changes to the team that won 2-1 at Hoffenheim in their Champions League play-off round first leg in mid-week.
Beaten 3-0 at home by Huddersfield Town on the opening weekend, Palace produced a much more solid display, but were undone with 17 minutes to play when Mane seized upon a loose ball to fire home.
Arsenal visit Stoke City in the late game.
Narrowly beaten 4-3 by Arsenal in the season’s opening match, 2016 champions Leicester City hit back to beat Brighton and Hove Albion 2-0 at the King Power Stadium.
Shinji Okazaki broke the deadlock after just 52 seconds, tapping in after Mathew Ryan saved from Riyad Mahrez, and Mahrez’s corner set up Harry Maguire to head in Leicester’s second early in the second half.
Charlie Austin scored a 93rd-minute penalty to earn Southampton a last-gasp 3-2 home win over West Ham.
Goals from Manolo Gabbidini and Dusan Tadic, the latter a penalty, put Saints 2-0 up and West Ham new boy Marko Arnautovic was sent off in between for an elbow on Jack Stephens.
Javier Hernandez’s first two West Ham goals drew the 10 men level, only for Austin to secure victory from the spot after Maya Yoshida was fouled by Pablo Zabaleta.
Hal Robson-Kanu was hero and villain as West Bromwich Albion won 1-0 at Burnley.
The Wales striker came off the bench to score a 71st-minute winner, but was then sent off for leading with his arm in a challenge on Matthew Lowton.
Brazilian youngster Richarlison scored his first goal in English football and Etienne Capoue was also on target as Watford claimed a deserved 2-0 win at Bournemouth.


Benevolence, not bluster: How ‘Brand Salah’ bucks the trend

Updated 23 min 11 sec ago
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Benevolence, not bluster: How ‘Brand Salah’ bucks the trend

  • Mohamed Salah lines up for Liverpool in the Champions League final against Real Madrid on Saturday
  • Mohamed Salah has been unveiled as DHL’s new brand ambassador for the MENA region

LONDON: On Saturday Mohamed Salah will line up for Liverpool in the Champions League final against Real Madrid.
He will do so not only with the every member of the Red army behind him, but also the entire Arab world.
That is testament to his stratospheric rise — over the past nine months the Egyptian ace has gone from being a very good player, but one deemed as needing to justify his $52 million transfer fee, to a global superstar and cultural phenomenon.
As with any sporting star, with the adulation and attention comes potential pitfalls and, invariably, a new lexicon. So it was not surprising to hear the 25-year-old speak of “his brand” when he was unveiled as DHL’s new brand ambassador for the MENA region on Wednesday. Stars becoming brands is almost cliche now and one that Salah has clearly taken on board — he now has even his own logo.
“We are proud of him. Over the past two years, no has done what he has done. He has proved himself as one of the best and we wanted to deal with no one else, just him,” CEO of DHL in the Middle East and North Africa, Nour Suliman, said. “He is competing on another level and is the star of the Arab world. No one in the Arab world has done what he is doing. We are very proud to have him.”
Those types of corporate events, where a big multinational signs a deal with the latest big, young thing, lend themselves to the odd dollop of hyperbole. But there is little doubting the impact Salah has had on the pitch for Liverpool and Egypt, and off it in becoming a true Arab icon. And his utterance of the word “brand” is where Salah as a walking cliche begins and ends.
Every year in Egypt ahead of Ramadan the best dates are named after the most popular person in the country — the man or woman revered by the nation at that moment. In the past, the staple food of the holy month has tended to be named after political leaders.
This year there was no competition: The most succulent date has been named after Salah. At the DHL press conference he was presented with a packet of dates emblazoned with his face and name.
It said much about the man that he both looked and confessed to being “embarrassed.”
This week the British Museum in London displayed Salah’s green football boots as part of its Modern Egypt exhibition. And in a documentary about the player broadcast in the UK, he was credited with increasing attendances at England’s oldest mosque in Liverpool and improving the image of Islam by Dr. Abdul Hamid, a trustee at the mosque.
So while the signing of big deals hints he is very much the modern-day footballing superstar, everything else off the pitch suggests something else.
Salah is on social media, but does not, like many sports stars, live on it; he knows he is a hero for many, but pays more than mere lip service to his position as a role model; and he embraces attention (of both opposition defenders and fans) rather than seemingly getting annoyed by it if things are not going his way.
“I am not heavy into social media, I am on it and aware of it, but I don’t follow it that closely. It does not influence me,” he said.
“I am aware young people look up to me and I feel great that they do and that I can influence a young footballer to play better or train harder, or do better; that that makes me proud.”
This season Salah has done what few footballers have done before, transcend the game, and he has done so in a way characterized by benevolence rather than bluster.
Against Real Madrid he can again illustrate just what a talent he is — and if he does lead Liverpool to their sixth European Cup triumph, you get the feeling he will not let the adulation go to his head.