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Bella Hadid causes stir with Vogue Arabia cover

Bella Hadid in Vogue Arabia
DAMMAM: Months after her sister caused controversy on its cover, Vogue Arabia has chosen Palestinian-American model Bella Hadid to cover its coveted September issue. However, not everyone is pleased with the sight of another Hadid sister gracing the magazine cover.
Bella’s older sister Gigi Hadid made an appearance on the inaugural cover back in March. She wore a hijab in the issue, and as a result was accused of cultural appropriation.
The September cover has prompted fierce debate on how Vogue Arabia should choose cover stars having a stronger Arab connection.
“This is really bad. I was hopeful with the change in editor in chief but I’m disappointed that for this monumentally important and defining September issue, Vogue Arabia has decided to put yet another Hadid on the cover — it’s like their half Palestinian heritage and American supermodel status makes them the only worthy Arab models.. And it’s shot by Karl Lagerfeld? Why? There is no lack of competent and able Arab fashion photographers that should have been given this opportunity,” wrote Instagram user @malakelsawi.
@nihed192Still wrote: “Waiting for an actual Arabic women to be on the cover of Vogue ‘Arabia’.”
@nayra.salim commented: “Bella is an American ... she has never been to Palestine, can’t speak Arabic, she doesn’t know Arabic traditions, she’s grown up in USA!”
In an Instagram post, Bella wrote she was “honored and proud” to be on the cover, “specifically to represent and cherish my half-Palestinian blood from my father and his strong, loving, wonderful Arab side of my family.”
“This cover is in honor of my teta Khair Hadid, my family, and my Arab/Muslim friends out there ...,” she wrote.
Some social media users acknowledged Bella”s Palestinian roots and welcomed the cover.
“As an Arab, she makes me so proud. Glad to see she”s representing us,” wrote @onlyyyangel
@jasminezrl wrote: “Roots are roots. Her dad”s Palestinian so ultimately she is too. And she acknowledges it.”
“You can”t erase someone”s heritage just because you don”t like them,” commented another user.
DAMMAM: Months after her sister caused controversy on its cover, Vogue Arabia has chosen Palestinian-American model Bella Hadid to cover its coveted September issue. However, not everyone is pleased with the sight of another Hadid sister gracing the magazine cover.
Bella’s older sister Gigi Hadid made an appearance on the inaugural cover back in March. She wore a hijab in the issue, and as a result was accused of cultural appropriation.
The September cover has prompted fierce debate on how Vogue Arabia should choose cover stars having a stronger Arab connection.
“This is really bad. I was hopeful with the change in editor in chief but I’m disappointed that for this monumentally important and defining September issue, Vogue Arabia has decided to put yet another Hadid on the cover — it’s like their half Palestinian heritage and American supermodel status makes them the only worthy Arab models.. And it’s shot by Karl Lagerfeld? Why? There is no lack of competent and able Arab fashion photographers that should have been given this opportunity,” wrote Instagram user @malakelsawi.
@nihed192Still wrote: “Waiting for an actual Arabic women to be on the cover of Vogue ‘Arabia’.”
@nayra.salim commented: “Bella is an American ... she has never been to Palestine, can’t speak Arabic, she doesn’t know Arabic traditions, she’s grown up in USA!”
In an Instagram post, Bella wrote she was “honored and proud” to be on the cover, “specifically to represent and cherish my half-Palestinian blood from my father and his strong, loving, wonderful Arab side of my family.”
“This cover is in honor of my teta Khair Hadid, my family, and my Arab/Muslim friends out there ...,” she wrote.
Some social media users acknowledged Bella”s Palestinian roots and welcomed the cover.
“As an Arab, she makes me so proud. Glad to see she”s representing us,” wrote @onlyyyangel
@jasminezrl wrote: “Roots are roots. Her dad”s Palestinian so ultimately she is too. And she acknowledges it.”
“You can”t erase someone”s heritage just because you don”t like them,” commented another user.

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