Wildfires hit Greenland after record temperatures

This NOAA handout satellite photo taken on August 3rd, 2017 shows a cloud of smoke from wildfires burning in western Greenland, about 150 kilometers northeast of Sisimiut. (AFP)
Updated 20 August 2017
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Wildfires hit Greenland after record temperatures

STOCKHOLM: Police in Greenland warned people to stay away from western areas of the island as wildfires scorched swathes of scrubland.
In a statement, the police said it “still discourages all traffic — including hiking and hunting — in two areas around Nassuttooq and Amitsorsuaq.”
“The fires are not expected to end within the next few days,” the statement added.
Some of the blazes have been burning since July 31.
Denmark’s meteorological service BMI said the island registered its hottest-ever temperature of 24.8 degrees (77 Fahrenheit) on August 10.
Last year was Greenland’s hottest on record.
The Danish territory has lost about 4,000 gigatons of ice since 1995, British researchers said in June, making ice melt on the huge island the biggest single contributor to rising sea levels.


Power cuts from Iran: Afghan traders lose millions of dollars

Updated 21 July 2018
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Power cuts from Iran: Afghan traders lose millions of dollars

  • Years of low rain and snowfall have led to a drought in Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan where temperatures have risen in recent months
  • People in Herat and Nimroz are facing lots of problems from production

KABUL: Sustained power cuts from Iran have badly affected everyday life in Afghanistan’s western Herat province, where traders have lost millions of dollars as a result, Afghan officials said on Saturday.
An Afghan delegation was set to travel on Saturday to Iran to discuss the power shedding which began more than 10 days ago. Iranian officials cited growing warm weather as the reason, saying the country has also cut exports of electricity to Pakistan and Iraq.
Total power imports from Iran for Herat and Nimroz stand at 100 megawatts.
Herat, the second largest city in Afghanistan with an industrial park consisting of scores of factories, has taken the brunt of the power cuts, according Ahmad Khadem, an official for the chambers of commerce.
The Afghan officials described the load shedding as a violation of the agreement struck with Iran.
“People have been suffering a lot. People in Herat and Nimroz are facing lots of problems from production. Poultry and other businesses have lost millions,” said Wahidullah Tawhidi, a spokesman for Afghanistan’s national power company.
Jailani Farhad, a spokesman for Herat’s governor, told Arab News that local authorities have activated two tribunes of Salma Dam in Herat to cover part of the load shedding.
Afghanistan relies on imports of power from Central Asia and Iran.
Years of low rain and snowfall have led to a drought in Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan where temperatures have risen in recent months, pushing the need for electricity in the summer hot season in the region.