Sudanese children of Daesh militants released in Libya

Members of Libyan Red Crescent hand over the children of Sudanese Daesh members who operated in Libya, to a Sudanese official, in Misrata, Libya on Sunday. (REUTERS)
Updated 21 August 2017
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Sudanese children of Daesh militants released in Libya

MISRATA, Libya: Four children from Sudan whose parents are believed to have been killed fighting for Islamic State in the Libyan city of Sirte last year were handed over to the Sudanese consul on Sunday for return to their country.
Sirte was a stronghold for Islamic State from 2015-2016, when Libyan forces backed by US air strikes ousted the ultra-hard-line group. Hundreds of foreign militants joined Islamic State in Sirte.
Dozens of women and children detained toward the end of the fighting have been held in Misrata, the city from which the military campaign in Sirte was led.
They include nationals of Tunisia, Egypt, Sudan, Senegal, Chad, and Niger. Twenty-one Libyan children have been handed back to their families.
In June, eight children were handed over to the Sudanese authorities and returned to Sudan. Eleven other Sudanese women and children are still in Misrata.
The Red Crescent’s head of psychological support in Misrata, Salah Abuzreba, appealed to all countries “that haven’t responded until this moment to receive those children as a human act, so they can be returned to their relatives.”


Turkish opposition accused of insulting Erdogan via cartoons

Updated 18 July 2018
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Turkish opposition accused of insulting Erdogan via cartoons

  • Insulting the president is a crime punishable by up to four years in prison in Turkey
  • Erdogan filed close to 2,000 lawsuits against people for alleged insults

ANKARA: Turkey’s state-run news agency says President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has filed complaints against the main opposition party leader and 72 legislators accusing them of insults for posting and sharing a cartoon on social media that depicts him as a variety of different animals.
Anadolu Agency said complaints were filed Wednesday against Kemal Kilicdaroglu, who posted the cartoon on Twitter, and other officials who shared it in support of four university students arrested for holding up a poster of the same caricature during their graduation ceremony.
Insulting the president is a crime punishable by up to four years in prison in Turkey.
Erdogan filed close to 2,000 lawsuits against people for alleged insults, dropping many following a failed military coup in 2016 as a goodwill gesture, but filing many others since.