Score for Beatles hit ‘Eleanor Rigby’ goes for auction

A handout picture by Omega Auctions shows the original score for The Beatles song “Eleanor Rigby” that will be auctioned on September 11, 2017. (Omega Auctions via AFP)
Updated 21 August 2017
0

Score for Beatles hit ‘Eleanor Rigby’ goes for auction

LONDON: The original handwritten score for the Beatles song “Eleanor Rigby” is to be sold at auction, alongside the deeds of the grave of the woman said to have been immortalized by the Fab Four.
“Each item is fantastic, unique and of significant historical importance in itself, so to have both come up at the same time is an incredible coincidence,” said Paul Fairweather from Omega Auctions, which is selling the items.
“I expect there to be fierce bidding from across the globe,” he said.
The score, expected to fetch £20,000 ($26,000, 22,000 euros), is written in pencil by the Beatles’s late producer George Martin and signed by both Martin and Paul McCartney.
It also includes notes specifying that it was to be recorded at London’s Abbey Road Studio number two and that four violins, two violas and two cellos were to be used.
“Eleanor Rigby” was released in 1966 as the B-side to “Yellow Submarine,” and depicts its heroine as “wearing the face that she keeps in a jar by the door.”
McCartney previously said the name Eleanor was inspired by actress Eleanor Bron, who starred in the Beatles film “Help!” in 1965, and that Rigby came from the name of a wine merchant.
It emerged in the 1980s that the name is inscribed on a headstone in St. Peter’s churchyard in Woolton, Liverpool, where McCartney met John Lennon at a party in 1957.
The two Beatles also revealed that they used to take short cuts through the church grounds.
According to the grave, Eleanor Rigby died in 1939 at the age of 44.
But McCartney has stayed true to his story, saying in 2008 that “Eleanor Rigby is a totally fictitious character that I made up.”
“If someone wants to spend money buying a document to prove a fictitious character exists, that’s fine with me,” McCartney said at the time.
The deeds of the grave will be sold in a lot that includes a miniature Bible, dated 1899, with the name Elenor Rigby handwritten inside, and are expected to sell for £5,000.
The Beatles Memorabilia Auction will be held in Warrington, near Liverpool, on September 11.


The Royal Wedding’s ‘zaghrata’ mystery — who was ‘ululating’ as Harry and Meghan left the chapel?

Updated 21 May 2018
0

The Royal Wedding’s ‘zaghrata’ mystery — who was ‘ululating’ as Harry and Meghan left the chapel?

LONDON: As the dust settles on the weekend’s royal wedding extravaganza, Arab interest has switched from speculation over Meghan Markle’s dress to a more pressing mystery — who was ululating as the couple emerged from the chapel?
The high-pitched celebratory noise traditionally reserved for major celebrations in the Middle East were clearly audible as the newly weds paused at the top of the steps outside St. George’s Chapel in Windsor on Saturday. They again rang out as the couple descended the steps into the sunshine and the welcoming embrace of the crowds.
Was there an Arab guest in the crowd expressing their excitement for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex in their own inimitable fashion?
The UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office tweeted a video on their Arabic account of the supposed ululations, saying: “Maybe you can hear the ‘Zaghrata’ at the moment Harry and Meghan leave the church after the wedding?”


Zaghrata is a form of ululation practiced in the region.
Rima Maktabi - London bureau chief at the Al Arabiya News Channel, who was covering the wedding - told Arab News: “I heard it first when Harry went into the church and then when Meghan went inside, I didn’t understand what it was.
“The commentators were saying that they heard ‘international sounds’, and then as they came out, it was clear.”
However, the Arab claim to be the source of ululation is facing a challenge from a grandmother from Lesotho who told British media that Harry had pointed out to her and smiled as she made the noise.
Malineo Motsephe, 70, traveled from the African nation for the wedding, having met Harry through her work with one of his charities.
Ululating, it turns out, is as common a cultural phenomenon in parts of Africa as it is in the Arab world.