Hajj ‘a gift from heaven’ for Gazans

A Palestinian Muslim pilgrim says goodbye to her relatives in Gaza City, as she starts her journey for the annual Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia’s holy city of Makkah. (AFP)
Updated 25 August 2017
0

Hajj ‘a gift from heaven’ for Gazans

AMMAN: For the besieged Gazan population, the Hajj season is a godsend. Muslims fortunate enough to be chosen for the pilgrimage leap at the opportunity to escape the prison they have been stuck in for a decade.
Saudi Arabia normally grants one Hajj visa for every 1,000 Muslims in a country. With Palestine having a population of less than 7 million, the annual permits given to applicants from the West Bank (including East Jerusalem and Gaza) to travel to the holy places in Makkah and Madinah are about 6,500. Gazans, who make up 40 percent of the overall Palestinian population under occupation, are entitled to 2,500 visas.
The Palestinian minister of Awqaf said that this year’s Hajj consists of 2,640 pilgrims from Gaza. This number includes 1,000 relatives of those killed by Israeli forces, who will go as the guests of King Salman.
Qadaffi Al-Qatati, a senior official at the Islamic Waqf Ministry in Gaza, told Arab News that the problem is how to decide who gets to go. “When we opened registration for the Hajj in 2010, over 30,000 applied. For them this was a chance to leave the besieged Gaza Strip, even for a short time.”
The large number of applicants forced the ministry to make the choice by lottery. The problem was what to do in the next year with those who were not chosen, so it was decided to carry on randomly selecting people for seven years in a row.
“While this allowed people to know which year they would go on Hajj, it caused other problems for those whose livelihood, and therefore their ability to pay the cost of the Hajj, changed,” Al-Qatati said. At the same time, he explained that if they allow new registrations, they might get as many as 100,000 people applying.
Gazans have been unable to enjoy Umrah, which is the off-season pilgrimage, for the past three years because of the near-permanent closure of the Rafah crossing by the Egyptian authorities, allegedly due to security concerns.
Over the years, other problems have occurred. Some would-be pilgrims have become sick and even died, while others simply lost interest or were no longer able to pay the costs. “We introduced a substitute system where next of kin are allowed to take the place of their relative who is sick, unable to travel or no longer living,” said Al-Qatati. “If that failed, we would go back to the lottery to make the choice of who can go instead.”
While the system seems to have worked, the journeys to Makkah and Madinah were not so easy. While some 75 tour agencies are registered by the ministries of tourism and Waqf to arrange the trips, the bigger problems lie with the border authorities. Average costs of the trip – including buses, round-trip airplane costs and accommodation in Makkah and Madinah – are about $3,000 per person.
In earlier years, Hajj applicants used to be able to take charter flights from the nearby Al-Arish Airport direct to Makkah, but the violence in Egypt since the Arab Spring has made the airport unusable. Instead, pilgrims have to spend two to three days on the road and in airport lounges waiting to get on the plane.
While there are long delays on the Egyptian side of the border, the biggest delay is on the way back. Travelers told Arab News that the Egyptian authorities, who confiscate passports in both directions, wait for all the planes bringing Gaza passengers back to arrive first and get through passport control, before allowing the bus convoy – often as many as 16 large buses – to proceed to the Rafah crossing.


Saudi MERS outbreaks killed 23 over four months: WHO

Updated 20 min 48 sec ago
0

Saudi MERS outbreaks killed 23 over four months: WHO

  • The latest figures take the number of confirmed cases to 2,220 since September 2012, including 1,844 from Saudi Arabia
  • The disease is hard to spot, partly because it often infects people with an underlying condition such as diabetes, renal failure or chronic lung disease

GENEVA: Outbreaks of the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) killed 23 people in Saudi Arabia between Jan. 21 and May 31 this year, the World Health Organization said on Monday.
The deaths were among 75 laboratory-confirmed cases of MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) during the period, the WHO said, and take the total number of deaths from the disease to 790 since it was first diagnosed in humans in 2012.
The latest figures take the number of confirmed cases to 2,220 since September 2012, including 1,844 from Saudi Arabia.
One outbreak in February hit a private hospital in Hafer Albatin region, where the patient passed the disease to three health workers. There was another cluster of six cases in a hospital in Riyadh in the same month, although no health care workers were infected.
Two other clusters affected households in Jeddah and Najran.
MERS-CoV is a member of a virus family ranging from the common cold to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. It appears to have emerged in humans in Saudi Arabia in 2012, although it has been traced in camels, the source of the infection, back to at least 1983.
The disease is hard to spot, partly because it often infects people with an underlying condition such as diabetes, renal failure or chronic lung disease.
But it kills one in three sufferers, and hospital workers are at risk unless extreme caution is taken to identify MERS sufferers early and to protect health care workers from infection via airborne droplets such as from coughs and sneezes.
Susceptible people should avoid contact with suspected cases and with camels, and anyone who has contact with animals should wash their hands before and afterwards, the WHO said. Everyone should avoid drinking raw camel milk or camel urine, or eating undercooked meat.
Three MERS cases have been reported this year outside Saudi Arabia. Oman and the United Arab Emirates each reported a case, while in Malaysia a man fell ill after drinking unpasteurised camel milk during a pilgrimage to Saudi Arabia.