1,735,391 Hajj pilgrims arrived in Saudi Arabia

The directorate has set up a major plan to process pilgrims on their arrival.
Updated 29 August 2017
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1,735,391 Hajj pilgrims arrived in Saudi Arabia

JEDDAH: The General Directorate of Passports announced on Monday that up till now, the number of guests of Allah coming from abroad has reached 1,735,391.
Maj. Gen. Sulaiman Al-Yahya explained during a press conference held in Jeddah that the number of pilgrims coming by air was 1,631,979; 88,585 by land; and 14,585 by sea. He said that the Saudi leadership was keen on facilitating the entrance of pilgrims by land, sea and air.
He added that the directorate has set up a plan to process pilgrims on their arrival and is using advanced technical devices to ensure speed and accuracy in the arrival procedures of every pilgrim.
He pointed out that special administrative committees were formed and are currently located at the entrances of Makkah, notably in Ash Shimaisi, Taniim, Bouhaita and Karr.
“The directorate is also getting ready for the second phase of Hajj in the coming days regarding the departure of the guests of Allah and their safe return to their homeland.”
He also called upon foreign pilgrims not to overstay their Hajj visa so they will not be detained, interrogated or punished.


Sign language and Braille Qur’ans to help pilgrims at Two Holy Mosques

A blind Saudi reads in braille a copy of the Quran, Islam's holy book, inside a mosque on the first day of the holy fasting month of Ramadan in the coastal town of Qatif, 400 kms east of Riyadh, on May 27, 2017. (AFP)
Updated 11 min 22 sec ago
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Sign language and Braille Qur’ans to help pilgrims at Two Holy Mosques

  • Copies of the Qur’an in Braille along with other religious booklets are available, as are on-site specialists to help pilgrims during prayer times and guide them through the mosque sites

MAKKAH: Sign language, Braille Qur’ans and electric wheelchairs are some of the new features in Makkah and Madinah to help pilgrims with disabilities to execute the religious rites of Hajj and Umrah.
An official at the General Presidency for the Affairs of the Two Holy Mosques described those with disabilities as “highly motivated people with special powers” and that services had been established to aid them, providing them with ease and comfort and avoiding complications even during peak times.
Ahmed Al-Burqati, who is tasked with helping people at the presidency, told Arab News there were designated entrances to ease access to prayer areas, including the ones on the ground and first floors of the King Fahd expansion at the Grand Mosque in Makkah.
Other provisions include a pen that serves as a Qur’an reader, and help for holding and carrying Qur’ans for people unable to hold them. Copies of the Qur’an in Braille along with other religious booklets are available, as are on-site specialists to help pilgrims during prayer times and guide them through the mosque sites, he added.
Ahmed Badawi, an Egyptian pilgrim performing Umrah, said he was not expecting to find such services awaiting him in the Grand Mosque compound.
Other special services at the holy mosques include: Wheelchairs transported in golf carts to prayer areas; designated entrances; sign language interpreters for those with hearing or speech impairments; canes for the blind and visually impaired; and electric wheelchairs to perform key religious rites such as tawaf.